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Article

Sleep Position Detection with a Wireless Audio-Motion Sensor—A Validation Study

1
Faculty of Dental Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, 02-091 Warsaw, Poland
2
Department of Pediatric ENT, Medical University of Warsaw, 02-091 Warsaw, Poland
3
Institute of Metrology and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Mechatronics, Warsaw University of Technology, 02-525 Warsaw, Poland
4
Department of Otolaryngology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Carlo Ricciardi, Francesco Amato and Mario Cesarelli
Diagnostics 2022, 12(5), 1195; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12051195
Received: 25 March 2022 / Revised: 6 May 2022 / Accepted: 9 May 2022 / Published: 11 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Use of Motion Analysis for Diagnostics)
It is well documented that body position significantly affects breathing indices during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. They usually worsen while changing from a non-supine to a supine position. Therefore, body position should be an accurately measured and credible parameter in all types of sleep studies. The aim of this study was to specify the accuracy of a neck-based monitoring device (Clebre, Olsztyn, Poland) mounted at the suprasternal notch, in determining a supine and non-supine sleeping position, as well as specific body positions during sleep, in comparison to polysomnography (PSG). A sleep study (PSG along with a neck-based audio-motion sensor) was performed on 89 consecutive patients. The accuracy in determining supine and non-supine positions was 96.9%±3.9% and 97.0%±3.6%, respectively. For lateral positions, the accuracy was 98.6%±2% and 97.4%±4.5% for the right and left side, respectively. The prone position was detected with an accuracy of 97.3%±5.6%. The study showed a high accuracy in detecting supine, as well as other gross positions, during sleep based on a sensor attached to the suprasternal notch, compared to the PSG study. We feel that the suprasternal notch is a promising area for placing wireless sleep study devices. View Full-Text
Keywords: home sleep study; polysomnography; actigraphy; positional sleep apnea home sleep study; polysomnography; actigraphy; positional sleep apnea
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kukwa, W.; Lis, T.; Łaba, J.; Mitchell, R.B.; Młyńczak, M. Sleep Position Detection with a Wireless Audio-Motion Sensor—A Validation Study. Diagnostics 2022, 12, 1195. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12051195

AMA Style

Kukwa W, Lis T, Łaba J, Mitchell RB, Młyńczak M. Sleep Position Detection with a Wireless Audio-Motion Sensor—A Validation Study. Diagnostics. 2022; 12(5):1195. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12051195

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kukwa, Wojciech, Tomasz Lis, Jonasz Łaba, Ron B. Mitchell, and Marcel Młyńczak. 2022. "Sleep Position Detection with a Wireless Audio-Motion Sensor—A Validation Study" Diagnostics 12, no. 5: 1195. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12051195

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