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Open AccessArticle

Rapid Diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Wounds with Point-Of-Care Fluorescence Imaing

1
Department of Professional Practice, Scarborough Health Network, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M1E 4B9, Canada
2
Department of Honors Studies, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Thomas E. Serena
Diagnostics 2021, 11(2), 280; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11020280
Received: 1 February 2021 / Revised: 6 February 2021 / Accepted: 9 February 2021 / Published: 11 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Rise of Diagnostics in the Treatment of Chronic Wounds)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a common bacterial pathogen in chronic wounds known for its propensity to form biofilms and evade conventional treatment methods. Early detection of PA in wounds is critical to the mitigation of more severe wound outcomes. Point-of-care bacterial fluorescence imaging illuminates wounds with safe, violet light, triggering the production of cyan fluorescence from PA. A prospective single blind clinical study was conducted to determine the positive predictive value (PPV) of cyan fluorescence for the detection of PA in wounds. Bacterial fluorescence using the MolecuLight i:X imaging device revealed cyan fluorescence signal in 28 chronic wounds, including venous leg ulcers, surgical wounds, diabetic foot ulcers and other wound types. To correlate the cyan signal to the presence of PA, wound regions positive for cyan fluorescence were sampled via curettage. A semi-quantitative culture analysis of curettage samples confirmed the presence of PA in 26/28 wounds, resulting in a PPV of 92.9%. The bacterial load of PA from cyan-positive regions ranged from light to heavy. Less than 20% of wounds that were positive for PA exhibited the classic symptoms of PA infection. These findings suggest that cyan detected on fluorescence images can be used to reliably predict bacteria, specifically PA at the point-of-care. View Full-Text
Keywords: bacteria; fluorescence imaging device; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; chronic wounds bacteria; fluorescence imaging device; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; chronic wounds
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MDPI and ACS Style

Raizman, R.; Little, W.; Smith, A.C. Rapid Diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Wounds with Point-Of-Care Fluorescence Imaing. Diagnostics 2021, 11, 280. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11020280

AMA Style

Raizman R, Little W, Smith AC. Rapid Diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Wounds with Point-Of-Care Fluorescence Imaing. Diagnostics. 2021; 11(2):280. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11020280

Chicago/Turabian Style

Raizman, Rose; Little, William; Smith, Allie C. 2021. "Rapid Diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Wounds with Point-Of-Care Fluorescence Imaing" Diagnostics 11, no. 2: 280. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11020280

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