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Open AccessArticle

Is the 1-Minute Sit-To-Stand Test a Good Tool to Evaluate Exertional Oxygen Desaturation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease?

Pulmonology Department, Pedro Hispano Hospital, 4464-513 Matosinhos, Portugal
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Koichi Nishimura
Diagnostics 2021, 11(2), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11020159
Received: 27 December 2020 / Revised: 19 January 2021 / Accepted: 19 January 2021 / Published: 22 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management of COPD and Asthma)
Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with exertional oxygen desaturation, which may be evaluated using the 6-minute walking test (6MWT). However, it is a time-consuming test. The 1-minute sit-to-stand test (1STST) is a simpler test, already used to evaluate the functional status. The aim of this study was to compare the 1STST to the 6MWT in the evaluation of exertional desaturation. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 30 stable COPD patients who performed the 6MWT and 1STST on the same day. Six-minute walking distance (6MWD), number of 1STST repetitions (1STSTr), and cardiorespiratory parameters were recorded. Results: A significant correlation was found between the 6MWD and the number of 1STSTr (r = 0.54; p = 0.002). The minimum oxygen saturation (SpO2) in both tests showed a good agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.81) and correlated strongly (r = 0.84; p < 0.001). Regarding oxygen desaturation, the total agreement between the tests was 73.3% with a fair Cohen’s kappa (κ = 0.38; p = 0.018), and 93.33% of observations were within the limits of agreement for both tests in the Bland–Altman analysis. Conclusion: The 1STST seems to be a capable tool of detecting exercise-induced oxygen desaturation in COPD. Because it is a less time- and resources-consuming test, it may be applied during the outpatient clinic consultation to regularly evaluate the exercise capacity and exertional desaturation in COPD. View Full-Text
Keywords: COPD; 6MWT; STST; exercise capacity; oxygen desaturation; prognosis COPD; 6MWT; STST; exercise capacity; oxygen desaturation; prognosis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fernandes, A.L.; Neves, I.; Luís, G.; Camilo, Z.; Cabrita, B.; Dias, S.; Ferreira, J.; Simão, P. Is the 1-Minute Sit-To-Stand Test a Good Tool to Evaluate Exertional Oxygen Desaturation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease? Diagnostics 2021, 11, 159. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11020159

AMA Style

Fernandes AL, Neves I, Luís G, Camilo Z, Cabrita B, Dias S, Ferreira J, Simão P. Is the 1-Minute Sit-To-Stand Test a Good Tool to Evaluate Exertional Oxygen Desaturation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease? Diagnostics. 2021; 11(2):159. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11020159

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fernandes, Ana L.; Neves, Inês; Luís, Graciete; Camilo, Zita; Cabrita, Bruno; Dias, Sara; Ferreira, Jorge; Simão, Paula. 2021. "Is the 1-Minute Sit-To-Stand Test a Good Tool to Evaluate Exertional Oxygen Desaturation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease?" Diagnostics 11, no. 2: 159. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11020159

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