Next Article in Journal
Characterization of Rock Samples by A High-Resolution Multi-Technique Non-Invasive Approach
Previous Article in Journal
The Role of Siliceous High-Magnesium Basalts during the Formation of a Neoproterozoic Mafic-Ultramafic Intrusion in the Tarim Craton (China)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Methodological Approach to Reconstructing Lost Monuments from Archaeological Findings: The San Francesco di Castelletto Church in Genoa
Open AccessArticle

Paint Relics on Middle Age Building Stones as Proxies of Commercial Routes and Artistic Exchanges: A Multi-Analytical Investigation

Department of Earth, Environment and Life Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2019, 9(11), 663; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9110663
Received: 23 August 2019 / Revised: 23 October 2019 / Accepted: 25 October 2019 / Published: 28 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Archaeometric Implications of Minerals)
Fifty-four pieces out of 356 marble pieces deriving from the decorative and architectonic apparatus of the medieval monastic complex of S. Francesco of Castelletto (Genoa, Italy) preserve traces of varicolored paint layers. Microscopic samples of green, blue, red, pink, white, and yellow paint relics were collected by scalpel and analyzed by means of Scanning Electron Microscope coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), µ-Raman, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy with Attenuated Total Reflection (FTIR-ATR), to characterize pigments and binders. The combined results from the different techniques allowed verification that stone decoration in Genoa during the Middle Ages encompassed a calcite groundwork and the use of a mixture of oils and proteins (probably egg) to apply pigments. The assemblage of impurities within the pigment has been correlated with the provenance sites along the commercial continental (Hungary and France) and maritime (Sardinia, Cyprus, or Veneto) routes between the 13th and 15th centuries. Moreover, the investigation of the painted layer improved the characterization of the decorative techniques in use in Genoa during the Middle Ages. View Full-Text
Keywords: polychromies; pigments; medieval commercial routes; painted marble; architectural ornaments polychromies; pigments; medieval commercial routes; painted marble; architectural ornaments
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Scrivano, S.; Gaggero, L.; Volpe, E. Paint Relics on Middle Age Building Stones as Proxies of Commercial Routes and Artistic Exchanges: A Multi-Analytical Investigation. Minerals 2019, 9, 663.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop I did now initially check that there shouldn't be