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Correction published on 22 October 2018, see Minerals 2018, 8(10), 473.
Article

Key Factors Affecting Strength Development of Steel Slag-Dredged Soil Mixtures

1
Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, 1-3 Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Japan
2
Division of Sustainable Resources Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, 1-3 Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Japan
3
Division of Engineering and Policy for Sustainable Environment, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, 1-3 Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2018, 8(5), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8050174
Received: 6 February 2018 / Revised: 9 April 2018 / Accepted: 18 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Mineralogy)
Some of the steel slag from ironworks and dredged soils from marine and waterfront engineering work are partially treated as waste. However, a mixture of these two kinds of waste has the potential to be used as construction materials when mixed, due to chemical reactions forming secondary phases. Utilizing waste of such kind as a resource will help to improve sustainability in society by reducing waste and replacing virgin resources such as cement. Recently, it was reported that mixtures of steel slag and dredged soil hardens under specific conditions. The phase compositions of dredged soils and steel slags vary depending on the quantity of each component, which results in unpredictable strength development of mixtures. The effect of the variations in the components of steel slags and dredged soils on strength development of the mixtures is not yet clear, limiting the utilization of both materials. Understanding the hardening mechanisms of the mixtures will enable the prediction of strength development. Focusing on the variations in the components in steel slags and, especially of dredged soils, this study aims to identify the components in both materials that affect the secondary phase formation that are responsible for strength development. We found support for suggestions that calcium silicate hydrate, C-S-H, is one of the secondary phases responsible for the strength development of the mixtures. From a comparison of two kinds of steel slags and various dredged soils, the amount of portlandite in the steel slags and the amount of amorphous silica in the dredged soils are suggested as a couple of the key components of starting materials involved in the C-S-H formation. View Full-Text
Keywords: steel slag; dredged soil; amorphous silica; cementation; C-S-H; humic acid; geochemical modeling steel slag; dredged soil; amorphous silica; cementation; C-S-H; humic acid; geochemical modeling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Toda, K.; Sato, H.; Weerakoon, N.; Otake, T.; Nishimura, S.; Sato, T. Key Factors Affecting Strength Development of Steel Slag-Dredged Soil Mixtures. Minerals 2018, 8, 174. https://doi.org/10.3390/min8050174

AMA Style

Toda K, Sato H, Weerakoon N, Otake T, Nishimura S, Sato T. Key Factors Affecting Strength Development of Steel Slag-Dredged Soil Mixtures. Minerals. 2018; 8(5):174. https://doi.org/10.3390/min8050174

Chicago/Turabian Style

Toda, Kanako; Sato, Haruna; Weerakoon, Nilan; Otake, Tsubasa; Nishimura, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu. 2018. "Key Factors Affecting Strength Development of Steel Slag-Dredged Soil Mixtures" Minerals 8, no. 5: 174. https://doi.org/10.3390/min8050174

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