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Article

Ultrafast X-ray Diffraction Study of a Shock-Compressed Iron Meteorite above 100 GPa

1
Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
2
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA
3
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA
4
Unité Matériaux et Transformations Cité scientifique, CNRS, INRAE, Centrale Lille, UMR 8207—UMET, F-59000 Lille, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Now at CERN, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland.
Now at Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA.
Academic Editor: Martin Kunz
Minerals 2021, 11(6), 567; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11060567
Received: 13 April 2021 / Revised: 24 May 2021 / Accepted: 24 May 2021 / Published: 26 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structural Characterization of Earth Materials at Extreme Conditions)
Natural kamacite samples (Fe92.5Ni7.5) from a fragment of the Gibeon meteorite were studied as a proxy material for terrestrial cores to examine phase transition kinetics under shock compression for a range of different pressures up to 140 GPa. In situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) data were collected of a body-centered cubic (bcc) kamacite section that transforms to the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phase with sub-nanosecond temporal resolution. The coarse-grained crystal of kamacite rapidly transformed to highly oriented crystallites of the hcp phase at maximum compression. The hcp phase persisted for as long as 9.5 ns following shock release. Comparing the c/a ratio with previous static and dynamic work on Fe and Fe-rich Fe-Ni alloys, it was found that some shots exhibit a larger than ideal c/a ratio, up to nearly 1.65. This work represents the first time-resolved laser shock compression structural study of a natural iron meteorite, relevant for understanding the dynamic material properties of metallic planetary bodies during impact events and Earth’s core elasticity. View Full-Text
Keywords: ultrafast X-ray diffraction; laser shock compression; iron meteorite ultrafast X-ray diffraction; laser shock compression; iron meteorite
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tecklenburg, S.; Colina-Ruiz, R.; Hok, S.; Bolme, C.; Galtier, E.; Granados, E.; Hashim, A.; Lee, H.J.; Merkel, S.; Morrow, B.; Nagler, B.; Ramos, K.; Rittman, D.; Walroth, R.; Mao, W.L.; Gleason, A.E. Ultrafast X-ray Diffraction Study of a Shock-Compressed Iron Meteorite above 100 GPa. Minerals 2021, 11, 567. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11060567

AMA Style

Tecklenburg S, Colina-Ruiz R, Hok S, Bolme C, Galtier E, Granados E, Hashim A, Lee HJ, Merkel S, Morrow B, Nagler B, Ramos K, Rittman D, Walroth R, Mao WL, Gleason AE. Ultrafast X-ray Diffraction Study of a Shock-Compressed Iron Meteorite above 100 GPa. Minerals. 2021; 11(6):567. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11060567

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tecklenburg, Sabrina, Roberto Colina-Ruiz, Sovanndara Hok, Cynthia Bolme, Eric Galtier, Eduardo Granados, Akel Hashim, Hae J. Lee, Sébastien Merkel, Benjamin Morrow, Bob Nagler, Kyle Ramos, Dylan Rittman, Richard Walroth, Wendy L. Mao, and Arianna E. Gleason. 2021. "Ultrafast X-ray Diffraction Study of a Shock-Compressed Iron Meteorite above 100 GPa" Minerals 11, no. 6: 567. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11060567

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