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Article

Steel Slag Characterisation—Benefit of Coupling Chemical, Mineralogical and Magnetic Techniques

1
Université de Lyon, UJM–Saint–Etienne, CNRS, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans UMR 6524, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, France
2
Université Clermont Auvergne, CNRS, IRD, OPGC, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
3
Mines Saint-Étienne, Centre “Sciences des Processus Industriels et Naturels” (SPIN), Département “Procédés pour l’Environnement et les Géo-ressources” (PEG), UMR 5600 EVS, UMR 5307 LGF, F-42023 Saint-Étienne, France
4
INDUSTEEL FRANCE Groupe ArcelorMittal, B.P. 368, 42803 Rive de Gier, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2020, 10(8), 705; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10080705
Received: 16 June 2020 / Revised: 17 July 2020 / Accepted: 3 August 2020 / Published: 9 August 2020
Steel-making slag is largely used today in road construction and other applications, but significant volumes are landfilled and cannot be recycled for excessive contents in hazardous metals, such as chromium or vanadium. The long-term behaviour of this material is still little known, and the characterisation of large volume slag dumps remains an environmental challenge. In this study various analytical techniques are used to characterise Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) slag landfilled for several decades and exposed to chemical weathering and erosion. Coupling chemical, mineralogical and magnetic techniques helps to understand the relations between hazardous metals and mineral phases. A special interest is given to Fe-bearing minerals microstructure so as to link the magnetic properties of the material to its mineralogical composition. The studied slag presents high amounts of chromium (between 1 and 3 wt. %) and very high magnetic susceptibility values (near 60 × 10−6 m3/kg), explained by the presence of magnetite and a spinel solid solution. Some correlations are found between magnetic susceptibility and potentially hazardous metals, providing new perspectives for future environmental investigations. View Full-Text
Keywords: Electric Arc Furnace Slag; landfilling; mineralogy; hazardous metals; chromium; magnetic susceptibility Electric Arc Furnace Slag; landfilling; mineralogy; hazardous metals; chromium; magnetic susceptibility
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MDPI and ACS Style

Herbelin, M.; Bascou, J.; Lavastre, V.; Guillaume, D.; Benbakkar, M.; Peuble, S.; Baron, J.-P. Steel Slag Characterisation—Benefit of Coupling Chemical, Mineralogical and Magnetic Techniques. Minerals 2020, 10, 705. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10080705

AMA Style

Herbelin M, Bascou J, Lavastre V, Guillaume D, Benbakkar M, Peuble S, Baron J-P. Steel Slag Characterisation—Benefit of Coupling Chemical, Mineralogical and Magnetic Techniques. Minerals. 2020; 10(8):705. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10080705

Chicago/Turabian Style

Herbelin, Maud, Jérôme Bascou, Véronique Lavastre, Damien Guillaume, Mhammed Benbakkar, Steve Peuble, and Jean-Philippe Baron. 2020. "Steel Slag Characterisation—Benefit of Coupling Chemical, Mineralogical and Magnetic Techniques" Minerals 10, no. 8: 705. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10080705

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