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Article

Low Temperature Serpentinite Replacement by Carbonates during Seawater Influx in the Newfoundland Margin

1
Institut des Sciences de la Terre, University of Lausanne, Quartier UNIL-Mouline Bâtiment Géopolis, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
2
University Grenoble Alpes, University Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS, IRD, IFSTTAR, ISTerre, 38000 Grenoble, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2020, 10(2), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10020184
Received: 22 January 2020 / Revised: 10 February 2020 / Accepted: 11 February 2020 / Published: 18 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geological and Mineralogical Sequestration of CO2)
Serpentinite replacement by carbonates in the seafloor is one of the main carbonation processes in nature providing insights into the mechanisms of CO2 sequestration; however, the onset of this process and the conditions for the reaction to occur are not yet fully understood. Preserved serpentine rim with pseudomorphs of carbonate after serpentine and lobate-shaped carbonate grains are key structural features for replacement of serpentinite by carbonates. Cathodoluminescence microscopy reveals that Ca-rich carbonate precipitation in serpentinite is associated with a sequential assimilation of Mn. Homogeneous δ18O values at the µm-scale within grains and host sample indicate low formation temperature (<20 °C) from carbonation initiation, with a high fluid to rock ratio. δ13C (1–3 ± 1‰) sit within the measured values for hydrothermal systems (−3–3‰), with no systematic correlation with the Mn content. δ13C values reflect the inorganic carbon dominance and the seawater source of CO2 for carbonate. Thermodynamic modeling of fluid/rock interaction during seawater transport in serpentine predicts Ca-rich carbonate production, at the expense of serpentine, only at temperatures below 50 °C during seawater influx. Mg-rich carbonates can also be produced when using a model of fluid discharge, but at significantly higher temperatures (150 °C). This has major implications for the setting of carbonation in present-day and in fossil margins. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbonation; CO2 sequestration; replacement process; low temperature carbonate precipitation; Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer; seawater influx; hydrothermal circulation; ophicalcite carbonation; CO2 sequestration; replacement process; low temperature carbonate precipitation; Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer; seawater influx; hydrothermal circulation; ophicalcite
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MDPI and ACS Style

Picazo, S.; Malvoisin, B.; Baumgartner, L.; Bouvier, A.-S. Low Temperature Serpentinite Replacement by Carbonates during Seawater Influx in the Newfoundland Margin. Minerals 2020, 10, 184. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10020184

AMA Style

Picazo S, Malvoisin B, Baumgartner L, Bouvier A-S. Low Temperature Serpentinite Replacement by Carbonates during Seawater Influx in the Newfoundland Margin. Minerals. 2020; 10(2):184. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10020184

Chicago/Turabian Style

Picazo, Suzanne, Benjamin Malvoisin, Lukas Baumgartner, and Anne-Sophie Bouvier. 2020. "Low Temperature Serpentinite Replacement by Carbonates during Seawater Influx in the Newfoundland Margin" Minerals 10, no. 2: 184. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10020184

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