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Open AccessArticle

Fossil Resins–Constraints from Portable and Laboratory Near-infrared Raman Spectrometers

1
Polish Geological Institute-National Research Institute, Upper Silesian Branch, 1 Królowej Jadwigi Str., 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland
2
Oil and Gas Institute-National Research Institute, 25A Lubicz Str., 31-503 Krakow, Poland
3
Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, AGH University of Science and Technology, 30 Mickiewicz Av., 30-059 Krakow, Poland
4
Polish Geological Institute-National Research Institute, 4 Rakowiecka Str., 00-975 Warsaw, Poland
5
Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, 3 Noakowskiego Str., 00-664 Warsaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2020, 10(2), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10020104
Received: 6 December 2019 / Revised: 15 January 2020 / Accepted: 17 January 2020 / Published: 25 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Raman Spectroscopy of Minerals)
Comparative studies of fossil resins of various ages, botanical sources, geological environments, and provenience were provided via a handheld portable Near-Infrared (NIR)-Raman spectrometer and benchtop instrument both working with laser line 1064 nm. The recorded Raman spectra of individual fossil resins were found to be sufficiently similar irrespective to the device type applied, i.e., handheld or benchtop. Thus, the portable equipment was found to be a sufficient tool for the preliminary identification of resins based on botanical and geographical origin criteria. The observed height ratio of 1640/1440 cm−1 Raman bands did not correlate well with the ages of fossil resins. Hence, it may be assumed that geological conditions such as volcanic activity and/or hydrothermal heating are plausible factors accelerating the maturation of resins and cross-linking processes. View Full-Text
Keywords: fossil resins; NIR-Raman spectroscopy; 1064 nm laser line; maturation; fossilization; polymerization fossil resins; NIR-Raman spectroscopy; 1064 nm laser line; maturation; fossilization; polymerization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Naglik, B.; Mroczkowska-Szerszeń, M.; Dumańska-Słowik, M.; Natkaniec-Nowak, L.; Drzewicz, P.; Stach, P.; Żukowska, G. Fossil Resins–Constraints from Portable and Laboratory Near-infrared Raman Spectrometers. Minerals 2020, 10, 104.

AMA Style

Naglik B, Mroczkowska-Szerszeń M, Dumańska-Słowik M, Natkaniec-Nowak L, Drzewicz P, Stach P, Żukowska G. Fossil Resins–Constraints from Portable and Laboratory Near-infrared Raman Spectrometers. Minerals. 2020; 10(2):104.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Naglik, Beata; Mroczkowska-Szerszeń, Maja; Dumańska-Słowik, Magdalena; Natkaniec-Nowak, Lucyna; Drzewicz, Przemysław; Stach, Paweł; Żukowska, Grażyna. 2020. "Fossil Resins–Constraints from Portable and Laboratory Near-infrared Raman Spectrometers" Minerals 10, no. 2: 104.

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