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Article

Microstructures and Fabric Transitions of Natural Ice from the Styx Glacier, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica

1
Division of Polar Earth-System Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon 21990, Korea
2
Department of Geology, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
3
Division of Polar Paleoenvironment, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon 21990, Korea
4
Key Laboratory of Earth and Planetary Physics, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
5
Department of Geophysics, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 24341, Korea
6
Antarctic K-Route Expedition Team, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon 21990, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2020, 10(10), 892; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10100892
Received: 10 August 2020 / Revised: 23 September 2020 / Accepted: 7 October 2020 / Published: 8 October 2020
We investigated the microstructures of five ice core samples from the Styx Glacier, northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Evidence of dynamic recrystallization was found in all samples: those at 50 m mainly by polygonization, and those at 170 m, largely by grain boundary migration. Crystallographic preferred orientations of all analyzed samples (view from the surface) typically showed a single cluster of c-axes normal to the surface. A girdle intersecting the single cluster occurs at 140–170 m with a tight cluster of a-axes normal to the girdle. We interpret the change of crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) at <140 m as relating to a combination of vertical compression, and shear on a horizontal plane, and the girdle CPOs at depths >140 m, as the result of horizontal extension. Based on the data obtained from the ground penetrating radar, the underlying bedrock topography of a nunatak could have generated the extensional stress regime in the study area. The results imply changeable stress regimes that may occur during burial as a result of external kinematic controls, such as an appearance of a small peak in the bedrock. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ice; microstructure; crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO); Styx Glacier; electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) Ice; microstructure; crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO); Styx Glacier; electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, D.; Prior, D.J.; Han, Y.; Qi, C.; Han, H.; Ju, H.T. Microstructures and Fabric Transitions of Natural Ice from the Styx Glacier, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Minerals 2020, 10, 892. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10100892

AMA Style

Kim D, Prior DJ, Han Y, Qi C, Han H, Ju HT. Microstructures and Fabric Transitions of Natural Ice from the Styx Glacier, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Minerals. 2020; 10(10):892. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10100892

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Daeyeong, David J. Prior, Yeongcheol Han, Chao Qi, Hyangsun Han, and Hyeon T. Ju 2020. "Microstructures and Fabric Transitions of Natural Ice from the Styx Glacier, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica" Minerals 10, no. 10: 892. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10100892

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