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Open AccessArticle

Sub-Surface Carbon Stocks in Northern Taiga Landscapes Exposed in the Batagay Megaslump, Yana Upland, Yakutia

1
Laboratory of Permafrost Landscapes, Melnikov Permafrost Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, 36 Merzlotnaya St., 677010 Yakutsk, Russia
2
Cryolithology and Glaciology Department, Faculty of Geography, Lomonosov Moscow State University, GSP-1, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow, Russia
3
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Telegrafenberg A45, 14473 Potsdam, Germany
4
Laboratory of General Geocryology, Melnikov Permafrost Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, 36 Merzlotnaya St., 677010 Yakutsk, Russia
5
Biogeoscience Educational and Scientific Trainings, North-Eastern Federal University, 677000 Yakutsk, Russia
6
Science Research Institute of Applied Ecology of the North, North-East Federal University, 43 Lenin Avenue, 677007 Yakutsk, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Land 2020, 9(9), 305; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9090305
Received: 21 July 2020 / Revised: 23 August 2020 / Accepted: 27 August 2020 / Published: 29 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Permafrost Landscape)
The most massive and fast-eroding thaw slump of the Northern Hemisphere located in the Yana Uplands of Northern Yakutia was investigated to assess in detail the cryogenic inventory and carbon pools of two distinctive Ice Complex stratigraphic units and the uppermost cover deposits. Differentiating into modern and Holocene near-surface layers (active layer and shielding layer), highest total carbon contents were found in the active layer (18.72 kg m−2), while the shielding layer yielded a much lower carbon content of 1.81 kg m−2. The late Pleistocene upper Ice Complex contained 10.34 kg m−2 total carbon, and the mid-Pleistocene lower Ice Complex 17.66 kg m−2. The proportion of organic carbon from total carbon content is well above 70% in all studied units with 94% in the active layer, 73% in the shielding layer, 83% in the upper Ice Complex and 79% in the lower Ice Complex. Inorganic carbon is low in the overall structure of the deposits. View Full-Text
Keywords: ice complex; yedoma; organic carbon; inorganic carbon; total carbon; batagay megaslump; Northern Yakutia ice complex; yedoma; organic carbon; inorganic carbon; total carbon; batagay megaslump; Northern Yakutia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shepelev, A.G.; Kizyakov, A.; Wetterich, S.; Cherepanova, A.; Fedorov, A.; Syromyatnikov, I.; Savvinov, G. Sub-Surface Carbon Stocks in Northern Taiga Landscapes Exposed in the Batagay Megaslump, Yana Upland, Yakutia. Land 2020, 9, 305. https://doi.org/10.3390/land9090305

AMA Style

Shepelev AG, Kizyakov A, Wetterich S, Cherepanova A, Fedorov A, Syromyatnikov I, Savvinov G. Sub-Surface Carbon Stocks in Northern Taiga Landscapes Exposed in the Batagay Megaslump, Yana Upland, Yakutia. Land. 2020; 9(9):305. https://doi.org/10.3390/land9090305

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shepelev, Andrei G.; Kizyakov, Alexander; Wetterich, Sebastian; Cherepanova, Alexandra; Fedorov, Alexander; Syromyatnikov, Igor; Savvinov, Grigoriy. 2020. "Sub-Surface Carbon Stocks in Northern Taiga Landscapes Exposed in the Batagay Megaslump, Yana Upland, Yakutia" Land 9, no. 9: 305. https://doi.org/10.3390/land9090305

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