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Delivering Climate-Development Co-Benefits through Multi-Stakeholder Forestry Projects in Madagascar: Opportunities and Challenges

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School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
2
School of Law and Politics, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK
3
Doctoral School of Natural Ecosystems, University of Mahajanga, Immeuble Kakal, Mahajanga 401-BP:652, Madagascar
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Land 2020, 9(5), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9050157
Received: 15 April 2020 / Revised: 15 May 2020 / Accepted: 15 May 2020 / Published: 18 May 2020
This paper explores multi-stakeholder perspectives on the extent to which forestry projects that pursue ecological restoration and rehabilitation in Madagascar engage with local communities and can co-deliver climate-development benefits. Drawing on mixed methods (policy analysis, semi-structured interviews, participatory site visits and focus groups) in two different forestry contexts, we show that by strengthening access to capital availability, projects can enhance local adaptive capacity and mitigation and deliver local development. We show that active consideration of ecological conservation and action plans early in project design and implementation can co-develop and support monitoring and reporting systems, needed to progress towards integrated climate-compatible development approaches. Climate mitigation benefits remain poorly quantified due to limited interest in, and low capacity to generate, carbon revenues. Monitoring alone does not ensure carbon benefits will materialize, and this research stresses that institutional considerations and strengthened engagement and cooperation between practitioners and communities are key in achieving both climate mitigation and community development impacts. Multiple benefits can be fostered by aligning objectives of multiple landscape actors (i.e., community needs and project developers) and by systematically linking project deliverables, outputs, outcomes and impacts over time, grounded in a theory of change focused on ensuring community buy-in and planning for delivery of tangible benefits. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate and development; forest conservation; REDD; sustainable land management; project monitoring and evaluation; mangroves climate and development; forest conservation; REDD; sustainable land management; project monitoring and evaluation; mangroves
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Favretto, N.; Afionis, S.; Stringer, L.C.; Dougill, A.J.; Quinn, C.H.; Ranarijaona, H.L.T. Delivering Climate-Development Co-Benefits through Multi-Stakeholder Forestry Projects in Madagascar: Opportunities and Challenges. Land 2020, 9, 157.

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