Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Governing Grazing and Mobility in the Samburu Lowlands, Kenya
Previous Article in Journal
System Properties Determine Food Security and Biodiversity Outcomes at Landscape Scale: A Case Study from West Flores, Indonesia
Previous Article in Special Issue
Chiefs in a Democracy: A Case Study of the ‘New’ Systems of Regulating Firewood Harvesting in Post-Apartheid South Africa
Article Menu
Issue 2 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

A Slipping Hold? Farm Dweller Precarity in South Africa’s Changing Agrarian Economy and Climate

1
Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies, University of the Western Cape, 7535 Western Cape, South Africa
2
Adrian Nel: University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 3201 KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
3
Samuel Chademana: Groundwork, 3201 Pietermaritzburg, South Africa
4
Nompilo Khanyile: Association for Rural Advancement, 3201 Pietermaritzburg, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 February 2018 / Revised: 6 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 23 March 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [1546 KB, uploaded 3 May 2018]   |  

Abstract

The paper investigates whether farm dwellers in the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) province of South Africa are subject to a “double exposure”: vulnerable both to the impacts of post-apartheid agrarian dynamics and to the risks of climate change. The evidence is drawn from a 2017 survey that was undertaken by the Association for Rural Advancement (AFRA), which is a land rights Non-Governmental Organization (NGO), of 843 farm dweller households. Data on the current living conditions and livelihoods was collected on 15.3% of the farm dweller population in the area. The paper demonstrates that farm dwellers are a fragmented, agricultural precariat subject to push and pull drivers of mobility that leave them with a precarious hold on rural farm dwellings. The key provocation is that we need to be attentive to whether the hold farm dwellers have over land and livelihoods is slipping further as a result of instability in the agrarian economy? This instability arises from agriculture’s arguably maladaptive response to the intersection of structural agrarian change and climate risk in post-apartheid South Africa. While the outcomes will only be apparent in time, the risks are real, and the paper concludes with a call for agrarian policy pathways that are both more adaptive and achieve social justice objectives. View Full-Text
Keywords: agrarian dynamics; climate change; farm dwellers; livelihoods; precariat; vulnerability; South Africa agrarian dynamics; climate change; farm dwellers; livelihoods; precariat; vulnerability; South Africa
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Hornby, D.; Nel, A.; Chademana, S.; Khanyile, N. A Slipping Hold? Farm Dweller Precarity in South Africa’s Changing Agrarian Economy and Climate. Land 2018, 7, 40.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Land EISSN 2073-445X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top