Next Article in Journal
Growing City and Rapid Land Use Transition: Assessing Multiple Hazards and Risks in the Pokhara Valley, Nepal
Next Article in Special Issue
Assessing and Governing Ecosystem Services Trade-Offs in Agrarian Landscapes: The Case of Biogas
Previous Article in Journal
Simulation vs. Definition: Differing Approaches to Setting Probabilities for Agent Behaviour
Previous Article in Special Issue
Disentangling Values in the Interrelations between Cultural Ecosystem Services and Landscape Conservation—A Case Study of the Ifugao Rice Terraces in the Philippines
Open AccessArticle

Using an Agroecosystem Services Approach to Assess Tillage Methods: A Case Study in the Shikma Region

Open Landscape Institute (Machon Deshe), Negev 2 St., Tel Aviv 66186, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Benjamin Burkhard, Stefan Hotes and Hubert Wiggering
Land 2015, 4(4), 938-956; https://doi.org/10.3390/land4040938
Received: 1 June 2015 / Revised: 21 September 2015 / Accepted: 21 September 2015 / Published: 2 October 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agro(Eco)System Services—Supply and Demand from Fields to Society)
The use of ecosystem services (ES) in agricultural management is expanding; however, its integration in decision making processes is still challenging. This project was formulated to examine the ES approach and its usefulness with regard to management dilemmas. The Shikma region, north of the Negev Desert, was chosen as a case study. The management issue identified was the effect of various alternatives (minimum-tillage, no-tillage, straw-mulch and stubble-grazing) on the supply of ES. The expert-based ES assessments’ findings reveal that no-tillage has the potential to increase many agroecosystem services and be more profitable for the farmer and the public. However, trade-offs between different ES and among stakeholder groups make it difficult to reach an unequivocal conclusion. As we have found, the process of the study is as important as the results. Throughout the project, an effort was made to engage stakeholders and policy-makers and to define decision-making processes. The study suggests that the ES approach can be useful in expanding the scope of agricultural management beyond provisioning services and create collaborations among farmers, communities, national institutions and environmental organizations to advance conservation agriculture. The study provides guidelines for conducting a productive ES assessment process that will lead to enhanced awareness and implementation. View Full-Text
Keywords: no-tillage; soil erosion; ecosystem services; conservation tillage; multi-stakeholder analysis; straw mulch; stubble grazing; Negev Desert no-tillage; soil erosion; ecosystem services; conservation tillage; multi-stakeholder analysis; straw mulch; stubble grazing; Negev Desert
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sagie, H.; Ramon, U. Using an Agroecosystem Services Approach to Assess Tillage Methods: A Case Study in the Shikma Region. Land 2015, 4, 938-956.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop