Next Article in Journal
Using Photovisualizations to Gain Perspectives on River Conservation over Time
Next Article in Special Issue
Interactive Effects on Habitat Quality Using InVEST and GeoDetector Models in Wenzhou, China
Previous Article in Journal
Assessment of the Sustainability Performance of Eco-Engineering Measures in the Mediterranean Region
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Intention of Community Participation in the Qilian Mountain National Park Policy Pilot
Article

Understanding Residents’ Perceptions of the Ecosystem to Improve Park–People Relationships in Wuyishan National Park, China

by 1,* and 2
1
Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
2
Management World Journal Press, Development Research Center of the State Council, Beijing 100026, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Rui Yang, Yue Cao, Steve Carver and Le Yu
Land 2022, 11(4), 532; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11040532
Received: 8 March 2022 / Revised: 31 March 2022 / Accepted: 2 April 2022 / Published: 6 April 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue National Parks and Protected Areas)
A healthy park–people relationship depends essentially on the fair and sustainable maintenance of rural livelihood. When a protected area is designated, rural people may face restrictions on access to land and resource use. In Wuyishan of China, we analyzed the role of traditional tea cultivation during consistent protected area management to find ways to maintain the stability of this social-ecological system in the new national park era. Based on the social-ecological system meaning perception, we used an intensive social survey to investigate residents’ perception of the ecosystem in terms of tea cultivation and its interaction with conservation policies. Results showed that tea cultivation brought major household income and was associated with multiple cultural services. Protected area management affected land use, and conservation outcomes were more obvious to farmers than economic and social ones. We argue that the multi-functionality of the forest-tea system has the potential to benefit both the local people and the public through conservation-compatible activities at three levels: to regulate biophysical elements in the land plot, to link production and market at the mountain level, and to secure tenure and encourage community participation at the landscape level. This knowledge co-production approach revealed that to avoid a negative park–people relationship, traditional knowledge and people’s right to benefit must be respected. View Full-Text
Keywords: national park; social-ecological system; ecosystem services; tea cultivation; protected area management national park; social-ecological system; ecosystem services; tea cultivation; protected area management
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

He, S.; Su, Y. Understanding Residents’ Perceptions of the Ecosystem to Improve Park–People Relationships in Wuyishan National Park, China. Land 2022, 11, 532. https://doi.org/10.3390/land11040532

AMA Style

He S, Su Y. Understanding Residents’ Perceptions of the Ecosystem to Improve Park–People Relationships in Wuyishan National Park, China. Land. 2022; 11(4):532. https://doi.org/10.3390/land11040532

Chicago/Turabian Style

He, Siyuan, and Yang Su. 2022. "Understanding Residents’ Perceptions of the Ecosystem to Improve Park–People Relationships in Wuyishan National Park, China" Land 11, no. 4: 532. https://doi.org/10.3390/land11040532

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop