Next Article in Journal
Development of a Land Use Carbon Inventory for Agricultural Soils in the Canadian Province of Ontario
Previous Article in Journal
Does Livelihood Capital Influence the Livelihood Strategy of Herdsmen? Evidence from Western China
Previous Article in Special Issue
Assessing Controversial Desertification Prevention Policies in Ecologically Fragile and Deeply Impoverished Areas: A Case Study of Marginal Parts of the Taklimakan Desert, China
Review

Maintaining the Many Societal Benefits of Rangelands: The Case of Hawaiʻi

1
University of Hawaiʻi Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
2
Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
3
Natural Capital Project, Department of Biology and Woods Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
4
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
5
American Museum of Natural History, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, New York, NY 10024, USA
6
College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management (CAFNNRM), University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, Hilo, HI 96720, USA
7
Haleakalā Ranch, Makawao, HI 96768, USA
8
Healthy Soils Hawaiʻi, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Becky Chaplin-Kramer and Ginger Allington
Land 2021, 10(7), 764; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10070764
Received: 2 June 2021 / Revised: 8 July 2021 / Accepted: 13 July 2021 / Published: 20 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Rangeland Management to Protect Habitat and Livelihoods)
Well-managed rangelands provide important economic, environmental, and cultural benefits. Yet, many rangelands worldwide are experiencing pressures of land-use change, overgrazing, fire, and drought, causing rapid degradation. These pressures are especially acute in the Hawaiian Islands, which we explore as a microcosm with some broadly relevant lessons. Absent stewardship, land in Hawaiʻi is typically subject to degradation through the spread and impacts of noxious invasive plant species; feral pigs, goats, deer, sheep, and cattle; and heightened fire risk. We first provide a framework, and then review the science demonstrating the benefits of well-managed rangelands, for production of food; livelihoods; watershed services; climate security; soil health; fire risk reduction; biodiversity; and a wide array of cultural values. Findings suggest that rangelands, as part of a landscape mosaic, contribute to social and ecological health and well-being in Hawaiʻi. We conclude by identifying important knowledge gaps around rangeland ecosystem services and highlight the need to recognize rangelands and their stewards as critical partners in achieving key sustainability goals, and in bridging the long-standing production-conservation divide. View Full-Text
Keywords: conservation; cultural values; ecosystem services; land policy; natural capital; stewardship; sustainable development; grazing conservation; cultural values; ecosystem services; land policy; natural capital; stewardship; sustainable development; grazing
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bremer, L.L.; Nathan, N.; Trauernicht, C.; Pascua, P.; Krueger, N.; Jokiel, J.; Barton, J.; Daily, G.C. Maintaining the Many Societal Benefits of Rangelands: The Case of Hawaiʻi. Land 2021, 10, 764. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10070764

AMA Style

Bremer LL, Nathan N, Trauernicht C, Pascua P, Krueger N, Jokiel J, Barton J, Daily GC. Maintaining the Many Societal Benefits of Rangelands: The Case of Hawaiʻi. Land. 2021; 10(7):764. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10070764

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bremer, Leah L., Neil Nathan, Clay Trauernicht, Puaʻala Pascua, Nicholas Krueger, Jordan Jokiel, Jayme Barton, and Gretchen C. Daily. 2021. "Maintaining the Many Societal Benefits of Rangelands: The Case of Hawaiʻi" Land 10, no. 7: 764. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10070764

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop