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Article

Community Perceptions of a Payment for Ecosystem Services Project in Southwest Madagascar: A Preliminary Study

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Institut Halieutiques et de Science Marines (IH.SM), Université de Toliara, BP141—Route du Port, Avenue de France, Toliara 601, Madagascar
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Blue Ventures Conservation, Villa Huguette, Lot II U 86, Cité Planton, Ampahibe, Antananarivo 101, Madagascar
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vanessa Winchester
Land 2021, 10(6), 597; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10060597
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 31 May 2021 / Accepted: 31 May 2021 / Published: 4 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Ecosystems: Protection and Restoration)
Despite the popularity of Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) schemes as a new paradigm to enhance conservation of natural resources, evidence of their benefits to people and nature is often illustrated from desk-based reviews, but rarely investigated from the local sites where they have been implemented. We investigated local perceptions of a PES scheme implemented in the Baie des Assassin’s mangroves of southwest Madagascar with particular focus on its perceived future effects. To meet our goal, we first collated socioeconomic and mangrove ecological information through extensive literature research, and key informant interviews with 35 peoples within the 10 villages surrounding the bay to be used as reference conditions. Following this, a workshop with 32 participants from local communities was conducted, using participatory scenario planning to predict the effects of the PES project, and to identify concerns surrounding its implementation. Local communities perceived the PES scheme as a potentially valuable approach for the sustainable management of their mangroves, and perceived that it would address major socioeconomic issues and mangrove management problems in the bay as a result of the carbon offsetting from their mangroves. We conclude that to achieve acceptance and good governance of a PES project by local communities, needs and concerns surrounding the implementation of the PES project need be addressed. View Full-Text
Keywords: mangroves; biodiversity; ecosystem services; scenario planning; Baie des Assassins mangroves; biodiversity; ecosystem services; scenario planning; Baie des Assassins
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rakotomahazo, C.; Razanoelisoa, J.; Ranivoarivelo, N.L.; Todinanahary, G.G.B.; Ranaivoson, E.; Remanevy, M.E.; Ravaoarinorotsihoarana, L.A.; Lavitra, T. Community Perceptions of a Payment for Ecosystem Services Project in Southwest Madagascar: A Preliminary Study. Land 2021, 10, 597. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10060597

AMA Style

Rakotomahazo C, Razanoelisoa J, Ranivoarivelo NL, Todinanahary GGB, Ranaivoson E, Remanevy ME, Ravaoarinorotsihoarana LA, Lavitra T. Community Perceptions of a Payment for Ecosystem Services Project in Southwest Madagascar: A Preliminary Study. Land. 2021; 10(6):597. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10060597

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rakotomahazo, Cicelin, Jacqueline Razanoelisoa, Nirinarisoa L. Ranivoarivelo, Gildas G.B. Todinanahary, Eulalie Ranaivoson, Mara E. Remanevy, Lalao A. Ravaoarinorotsihoarana, and Thierry Lavitra. 2021. "Community Perceptions of a Payment for Ecosystem Services Project in Southwest Madagascar: A Preliminary Study" Land 10, no. 6: 597. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10060597

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