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Article

Shoreline Dynamics in East Java Province, Indonesia, from 2000 to 2019 Using Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Data

1
Department of Geographic Information Science, Faculty of Geography, Gadjah Mada University, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia
2
Department of Environmental Geography, Faculty of Geography, Gadjah Mada University, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Land 2021, 10(2), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020100
Received: 9 December 2020 / Revised: 6 January 2021 / Accepted: 19 January 2021 / Published: 22 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geomatics for Resource Monitoring and Management)
Coastal regions are one of the most vulnerable areas to the effects of global warming, which is accompanied by an increase in mean sea level and changing shoreline configurations. In Indonesia, the socioeconomic importance of coastal regions where the most populated cities are located is high. However, shoreline changes in Indonesia are relatively understudied. In particular, detailed monitoring with remote sensing data is lacking despite the abundance of datasets and the availability of easily accessible cloud computing platforms such as the Google Earth Engine that are able to perform multi-temporal and multi-sensor mapping. Our study aimed to assess shoreline changes in East Java Province Indonesia from 2000 to 2019 using variables derived from a multi-sensor combination of optical remote sensing data (Landsat-7 ETM and Landsat-8 OLI) and radar data (ALOS Palsar and Sentinel-1 data). Random forest and GMO maximum entropy (GMO-Maxent) accuracy was assessed for the classification of land and water, and the land polygons from the best algorithm were used for deriving shorelines. In addition, shoreline changes were quantified using Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS). Our results showed that coastal accretion is more profound than coastal erosion in East Java Province with average rates of change of +4.12 (end point rate, EPR) and +4.26 m/year (weighted linear rate, WLR) from 2000 to 2019. In addition, some parts of the shorelines in the study area experienced massive changes, especially in the deltas of the Bengawan Solo and Brantas/Porong river with rates of change (EPR) between −87.44 to +89.65 and −18.98 to +111.75 m/year, respectively. In the study areas, coastal erosion happened mostly in the mangrove and aquaculture areas, while the accreted areas were used mostly as aquaculture and mangrove areas. The massive shoreline changes in this area require better monitoring to mitigate the potential risks of coastal erosion and to better manage coastal sedimentation. View Full-Text
Keywords: remote sensing; maximum entropy; Landsat; ALOS Palsar; Sentinel-1; Google Earth Engine remote sensing; maximum entropy; Landsat; ALOS Palsar; Sentinel-1; Google Earth Engine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Arjasakusuma, S.; Kusuma, S.S.; Saringatin, S.; Wicaksono, P.; Mutaqin, B.W.; Rafif, R. Shoreline Dynamics in East Java Province, Indonesia, from 2000 to 2019 Using Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Data. Land 2021, 10, 100. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020100

AMA Style

Arjasakusuma S, Kusuma SS, Saringatin S, Wicaksono P, Mutaqin BW, Rafif R. Shoreline Dynamics in East Java Province, Indonesia, from 2000 to 2019 Using Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Data. Land. 2021; 10(2):100. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020100

Chicago/Turabian Style

Arjasakusuma, Sanjiwana, Sandiaga S. Kusuma, Siti Saringatin, Pramaditya Wicaksono, Bachtiar W. Mutaqin, and Raihan Rafif. 2021. "Shoreline Dynamics in East Java Province, Indonesia, from 2000 to 2019 Using Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Data" Land 10, no. 2: 100. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020100

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