Next Article in Journal
Estimations of Water Volume and External Loading Based on DYRESM Hydrodynamic Model at Lake Dianchi
Previous Article in Journal
A Tree-Based Machine Learning Method for Pipeline Leakage Detection
 
 
Article

Initial Deployment of a Mobile Sensing System for Water Quality in Urban Canals

1
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
2
Senseable City Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
3
Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba 80215-901, PR, Brazil
4
Waternet, P.O. Box 94370, 1090 GJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Zhenyao Shen
Water 2022, 14(18), 2834; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182834
Received: 25 April 2022 / Revised: 2 August 2022 / Accepted: 19 August 2022 / Published: 12 September 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Urban Water Management)
Although water quality has extensively improved over the last decade, recreational uses of the canal network in Amsterdam are limited by variations in water quality associated with stormwater runoff and episodic harmful algal blooms. The current systems for monitoring water quality are based on a stationary network of sampling points, offline testing methods, and online measurements of conventional water quality parameters on board a boat that continuously navigates the urban canal network. Here we describe the development and deployment of online algal sensors on board the boat, including a prototype LED-induced fluorescence instrument for algal identification and quantification. We demonstrate that by using only a single patrol vessel, we are able to achieve enough sampling coverage to observe spatiotemporal heterogeneity of algal and chemical water quality within the canal network. The data provide encouraging evidence that opportunistic measurements from a small number of mobile platforms can enable high-resolution mapping and can be used to improve the monitoring of water quality across the city compared to the current network of fixed sampling locations. We also discuss the challenges of operating water quality sensors for long-term autonomous monitoring. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental sensing; water quality monitoring; mobile sensing; wireless sensor networks; chemical sensors; in situ spectrofluorometer environmental sensing; water quality monitoring; mobile sensing; wireless sensor networks; chemical sensors; in situ spectrofluorometer
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Meyers, D.; Zheng, Q.; Duarte, F.; Ratti, C.; Hemond, H.F.; van der Blom, M.; van der Helm, A.W.C.; Whittle, A.J. Initial Deployment of a Mobile Sensing System for Water Quality in Urban Canals. Water 2022, 14, 2834. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182834

AMA Style

Meyers D, Zheng Q, Duarte F, Ratti C, Hemond HF, van der Blom M, van der Helm AWC, Whittle AJ. Initial Deployment of a Mobile Sensing System for Water Quality in Urban Canals. Water. 2022; 14(18):2834. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182834

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meyers, Drew, Qinmin Zheng, Fábio Duarte, Carlo Ratti, Harold F. Hemond, Marcel van der Blom, Alex W.C. van der Helm, and Andrew J. Whittle. 2022. "Initial Deployment of a Mobile Sensing System for Water Quality in Urban Canals" Water 14, no. 18: 2834. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182834

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop