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Wastewater System Inflow/Infiltration and Residential Pluvial Flood Damage Mitigation in Canada

1
Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction, 20 Richmond Street East, Suite 210, Toronto, ON M5C 2R9, Canada
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Norton Engineering Inc., 243 Glasgow St., Kitchener, ON N2M 2M3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Marco Franchini
Water 2022, 14(11), 1716; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111716
Received: 22 April 2022 / Revised: 20 May 2022 / Accepted: 23 May 2022 / Published: 27 May 2022
Pluvial flooding in urban areas is one of the most significant drivers of disaster loss in Canada. Damages during pluvial flood events are associated with overwhelmed urban drainage (stormwater and wastewater) systems. During the period from 2013 to 2021, Canadian property and casualty insurers reported approximately CAD 2 billion in personal property (residential) pluvial sewer backup claims during flood catastrophes. There has been growing interest in managing pluvial urban flood risk, notably through newly funded national programs focused on climate change adaptation. These programs have included the development of new guidelines and standards focused on managing the underlying factors contributing to urban and basement flooding. Inflow and infiltration (I/I) has received limited attention in the pluvial flood literature, however. Informed by significant engagement with practitioners in Canada, this paper provides a review of the issue of I/I into wastewater systems and its relation to pluvial flooding. The paper will address concerns related to private property engagement in I/I and urban pluvial flood reduction programs. Both improved technical standards and administrative support are needed to ensure that wastewater infrastructure is less susceptible to I/I over its lifecycle. View Full-Text
Keywords: extreme rain; pluvial flood; basement flood; wastewater; inflow and infiltration; Canada extreme rain; pluvial flood; basement flood; wastewater; inflow and infiltration; Canada
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sandink, D.; Robinson, B. Wastewater System Inflow/Infiltration and Residential Pluvial Flood Damage Mitigation in Canada. Water 2022, 14, 1716. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111716

AMA Style

Sandink D, Robinson B. Wastewater System Inflow/Infiltration and Residential Pluvial Flood Damage Mitigation in Canada. Water. 2022; 14(11):1716. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111716

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sandink, Dan, and Barbara Robinson. 2022. "Wastewater System Inflow/Infiltration and Residential Pluvial Flood Damage Mitigation in Canada" Water 14, no. 11: 1716. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111716

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