Next Article in Journal
Phosphorous Supply to a Eutrophic Artificial Lake: Sedimentary versus Groundwater Sources
Previous Article in Journal
Groundwater Monitoring Systems to Understand Sea Water Intrusion Dynamics in the Mediterranean: The Neretva Valley and the Southern Venice Coastal Aquifers Case Studies
Open AccessArticle

Late Holocene Peatland Evolution in Terelj and Tuul Rivers Drainage Basins in the Khentii Mountain Range of Northeastern Mongolia

1
Laboratory of Geochemistry and Geomorphology, School of Arts and Sciences, National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar 14201, Mongolia
2
Division of Physical Geography, Institute of Geography and Geoecology, Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar 15170, Mongolia
3
School of Industrial Technology, University of Science and Technology, Ulaanbaatar 14191, Mongolia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Michał Słowiński
Water 2021, 13(4), 562; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040562
Received: 5 January 2021 / Revised: 9 February 2021 / Accepted: 19 February 2021 / Published: 23 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Paleoecological Research on Lake and Peat Bog Ecosystems)
This study reviews the late Holocene peatlands in Terelj River and Tuul River drainage basins in the Khentii (Khentii has been misspelled as Khentey (or Hentey) and Khentei (or Hentei) in many publications. The Khentii is the right English translation from Mongolian Xэнmuй) Mountain Range of northeastern Mongolia. The peatlands were examined through their physical and chemical properties, diatom assemblages, and radiocarbon dating. In the Terelj River basin, the high contents of organic matter and biogenic silica and the dominant benthic diatom assemblages such as Eunotia praerupta, Pinnularia borealis, and Navicula mutica in the peat deposits indicate the warm and humid climates in the late Holocene. The high accretion rate of 0.97 mm/yr in the peatland records the intensive erosion in the surrounding landscape and deposition in the peatland due to increased precipitation and runoff in the humid climate since 0.5 cal. ka BP. In the Tuul River basin, the high content of mineral fractions and diatom assemblages dominated by benthic species Cymbella proxima, Encyonema silesiacum, and planktonic species Cyclotella ocellata in the peat deposits show a transition from humid to arid climates at 0.9 cal. ka BP. The accretion rate of 0.56 mm/yr in the peatland on the paleo-floodplain indicates strengthened erosion in the peatland over the past ~1000 years. This study in the southern Khentii Mountain Range provides new descriptive insights to extend the underestimated Mongolia’s peat studies, and it would be a useful proof-of-concept study for future detailed paleo-environmental analyses. View Full-Text
Keywords: peatland; wetland; water resources; climate change; Tuul; Terelj; Khentii; Mongolia peatland; wetland; water resources; climate change; Tuul; Terelj; Khentii; Mongolia
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Orkhonselenge, A.; Uuganzaya, M.; Davaagatan, T.; Enkhbayar, G. Late Holocene Peatland Evolution in Terelj and Tuul Rivers Drainage Basins in the Khentii Mountain Range of Northeastern Mongolia. Water 2021, 13, 562. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040562

AMA Style

Orkhonselenge A, Uuganzaya M, Davaagatan T, Enkhbayar G. Late Holocene Peatland Evolution in Terelj and Tuul Rivers Drainage Basins in the Khentii Mountain Range of Northeastern Mongolia. Water. 2021; 13(4):562. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040562

Chicago/Turabian Style

Orkhonselenge, Alexander; Uuganzaya, Munkhjargal; Davaagatan, Tuyagerel; Enkhbayar, Ganbaatar. 2021. "Late Holocene Peatland Evolution in Terelj and Tuul Rivers Drainage Basins in the Khentii Mountain Range of Northeastern Mongolia" Water 13, no. 4: 562. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040562

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop