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Article

Estimation of Potential Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield: A Case Study of the Transboundary Chenab River Catchment

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Department of Irrigation and Drainage, Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Technology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38000, Pakistan
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Department of Water Management, Delft University of Technology, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands
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Department of Agricultural Engineering, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800, Pakistan
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Department of Agricultural Engineering, Khwaja Fareed University of Engineering and Information Technology, Rahim Yar Khan 64200, Pakistan
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Department of Civil Engineering, Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23460, Pakistan
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Department of Structures and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Technology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38000, Pakistan
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Department of Land and Water Conservation Engineering, Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Technology, PMAS Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi 46000, Pakistan
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Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock, Germany
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Csaba Centeri
Water 2021, 13(24), 3647; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243647
Received: 25 October 2021 / Revised: 7 December 2021 / Accepted: 15 December 2021 / Published: 18 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Water Erosion)
Near real-time estimation of soil loss from river catchments is crucial for minimizing environmental degradation of complex river basins. The Chenab river is one of the most complex river basins of the world and is facing severe soil loss due to extreme hydrometeorological conditions, unpredictable hydrologic response, and complex orography. Resultantly, huge soil erosion and sediment yield (SY) not only cause irreversible environmental degradation in the Chenab river catchment but also deteriorate the downstream water resources. In this study, potential soil erosion (PSE) is estimated from the transboundary Chenab river catchment using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), coupled with remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS). Land Use of the European Space Agency (ESA), Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Station (CHIRPS) data, and world soil map of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)/The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization were incorporated into the study. The SY was estimated on monthly, quarterly, seasonal, and annual time-scales using sediment delivery ratio (SDR) estimated through the area, slope, and curve number (CN)-based approaches. The 30-year average PSE from the Chenab river catchment was estimated as 177.8, 61.5, 310.3, 39.5, 26.9, 47.1, and 99.1 tons/ha for annual, rabi, kharif, fall, winter, spring, and summer time scales, respectively. The 30-year average annual SY from the Chenab river catchment was estimated as 4.086, 6.163, and 7.502 million tons based on area, slope, and CN approaches. The time series trends analysis of SY indicated an increase of 0.0895, 0.1387, and 0.1698 million tons per year for area, slope, and CN-based approaches, respectively. It is recommended that the areas, except for slight erosion intensity, should be focused on framing strategies for control and mitigation of soil erosion in the Chenab river catchment. View Full-Text
Keywords: RUSLE; soil erosion; sediment yield; Chenab river; remote sensing; GIS RUSLE; soil erosion; sediment yield; Chenab river; remote sensing; GIS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ali, M.G.; Ali, S.; Arshad, R.H.; Nazeer, A.; Waqas, M.M.; Waseem, M.; Aslam, R.A.; Cheema, M.J.M.; Leta, M.K.; Shauket, I. Estimation of Potential Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield: A Case Study of the Transboundary Chenab River Catchment. Water 2021, 13, 3647. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243647

AMA Style

Ali MG, Ali S, Arshad RH, Nazeer A, Waqas MM, Waseem M, Aslam RA, Cheema MJM, Leta MK, Shauket I. Estimation of Potential Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield: A Case Study of the Transboundary Chenab River Catchment. Water. 2021; 13(24):3647. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243647

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ali, Muhammad G., Sikandar Ali, Rao H. Arshad, Aftab Nazeer, Muhammad M. Waqas, Muhammad Waseem, Rana A. Aslam, Muhammad J.M. Cheema, Megersa K. Leta, and Imran Shauket. 2021. "Estimation of Potential Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield: A Case Study of the Transboundary Chenab River Catchment" Water 13, no. 24: 3647. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243647

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