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Applicability of Difference in Oxygen-18 and Deuterium of Water Sources and Isotopic Hydrograph Separation in a Bamboo Catchment during Different Rainfall Types

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College of Water Resources and Hydrology, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, China
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Water Resources Department of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210029, China
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Ningbo Hongtai Water Conservancy Information Technology Co., Ltd., Ningbo 315000, China
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Department of Aquatic Ecosystem Analysis and Management, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, 39114 Magdeburg, Germany
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Department of Ecohydrology and Biogeochemistry, Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), 12587 Berlin, Germany
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: David Widory
Water 2021, 13(24), 3531; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243531
Received: 28 September 2021 / Revised: 1 December 2021 / Accepted: 6 December 2021 / Published: 9 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Urban Water Management)
Typhoon storm and plum rain are two typical rainfall types in the lower regions of the Yangtze River Basin, which frequently cause flood disasters in China. New information in stable water isotopes offers the opportunity to advance understanding of runoff mechanisms and water source dynamics in response to these two typical rainfall types. We intensively monitored two representative rainfall events in a small bamboo forestry watershed in 2016. Results showed that precipitation isotopic variations during the event were generally larger than those of other monitored compartments (including throughfall, surface overland water, groundwater and river water) and also larger for the plum rain than for the typhoon event (δ18O varied in 5.2‰ and 3.7‰, respectively). Importantly, the differences of isotopic temporal variation between rainfall and throughfall showed significant impacts on the two-component hydrograph separation for both rainfall types (e.g., if not considered, the pre-event water fractions were 26.6% and 15.3% higher for the typhoon and plum rain events, respectively). Furthermore, we evaluated the role of soil water on the three-component isotopic hydrograph separation model; results revealed that soil water accounted for 10.9% and 28.3% of the total discharge in typhoon and plum rain events, respectively. This underpins the important role of soil water dynamics during the rainy season in this humid region. View Full-Text
Keywords: δ18O and δD isotopes; temporal variations during event; plum rain; typhoon; isotopic hydrograph separation; water sources δ18O and δD isotopes; temporal variations during event; plum rain; typhoon; isotopic hydrograph separation; water sources
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MDPI and ACS Style

You, Y.; Qu, S.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Shi, P.; Jiang, Y.; Yang, X. Applicability of Difference in Oxygen-18 and Deuterium of Water Sources and Isotopic Hydrograph Separation in a Bamboo Catchment during Different Rainfall Types. Water 2021, 13, 3531. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243531

AMA Style

You Y, Qu S, Wang Y, Yang Q, Shi P, Jiang Y, Yang X. Applicability of Difference in Oxygen-18 and Deuterium of Water Sources and Isotopic Hydrograph Separation in a Bamboo Catchment during Different Rainfall Types. Water. 2021; 13(24):3531. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243531

Chicago/Turabian Style

You, Yang, Simin Qu, Yifan Wang, Qingyi Yang, Peng Shi, Yuxun Jiang, and Xiaoqiang Yang. 2021. "Applicability of Difference in Oxygen-18 and Deuterium of Water Sources and Isotopic Hydrograph Separation in a Bamboo Catchment during Different Rainfall Types" Water 13, no. 24: 3531. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243531

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