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Effects of Arctic Warming on Microbes and Methane in Different Land Types in Svalbard

by 1,†, 1,†, 2,3,*, 4 and 4
1
MNR Key Laboratory for Polar Science, Polar Research Institute of China, Shanghai 200136, China
2
Laboratory for Marine Geology, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266071, China
3
Laboratory of Ecological Geology and Climate Change, Qingdao Institute of Marine Geology, Qingdao 266237, China
4
MNR Key Laboratory of Global Change and Marine-Atmospheric Chemistry, Third Institute of Oceanography, Xiamen 361000, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Co-fist authors: F.Z. & H.Z.
Academic Editor: Alexander Shiklomanov
Water 2021, 13(22), 3296; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223296
Received: 6 August 2021 / Revised: 27 October 2021 / Accepted: 2 November 2021 / Published: 21 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ice-Ocean-Atmosphere Exchanges in the Arctic Region and Its Impacts)
Climate change is having a profound impact on Arctic microbiomes and their living environments. However, we have only incomplete knowledge about the seasonal and inter-annual variations observed among these microbes and about their methane regulation mechanisms with respect to glaciers, glacial melting, snow lakes and coastal marine water. This gap in our knowledge limits our understanding of the linkages between climate and environmental change. In the Arctic, there are large reservoirs of methane which are sensitive to temperature changes. If global warming intensifies, larger quantities of methane stored in deep soil and sediments will be released into the atmosphere, causing irreversible effects on the global ecosystem. Methane production is mainly mediated by microorganisms. Although we have some knowledge of microbial community structure, we know less about the methane-correlated microbes in different land types in the Svalbard archipelago, and we do not have a comprehensive grasp of the relationship between them. That is the main reason we have written this paper, in which current knowledge of microorganisms and methane-correlated types in High Arctic Svalbard is described. The problems that need to be addressed in the future are also identified. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; High Arctic Svalbard; different landforms; microbial community; methane production and consumption; distribution and correlation climate change; High Arctic Svalbard; different landforms; microbial community; methane production and consumption; distribution and correlation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Pei, S.; Zhan, L.; Ye, W. Effects of Arctic Warming on Microbes and Methane in Different Land Types in Svalbard. Water 2021, 13, 3296. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223296

AMA Style

Zhang F, Zhang H, Pei S, Zhan L, Ye W. Effects of Arctic Warming on Microbes and Methane in Different Land Types in Svalbard. Water. 2021; 13(22):3296. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223296

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhang, Fang, Han Zhang, Shaofeng Pei, Liyang Zhan, and Wangwang Ye. 2021. "Effects of Arctic Warming on Microbes and Methane in Different Land Types in Svalbard" Water 13, no. 22: 3296. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223296

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