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Article

After the Storm: Fate and Leaching of Particulate Nitrogen (PN) in the Fluvial Network and the Influence of Watershed Sources and Moisture Conditions

1
Water Science & Policy Graduate Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
2
Plant & Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
3
Stroud Water Research Center, 970 Spencer Road, Avondale, PA 19311, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Gurpal S. Toor and Zhi Li
Water 2021, 13(22), 3182; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223182
Received: 27 September 2021 / Revised: 31 October 2021 / Accepted: 6 November 2021 / Published: 11 November 2021
Large storms can erode, transport, and deposit substantial amounts of particulate nitrogen (PN) in the fluvial network. The fate of this input and its consequence for water quality is poorly understood. This study investigated the transformation and leaching of PN using a 56-day incubation experiment with five PN sources: forest floor humus, upland mineral A horizon, stream bank, storm deposits, and stream bed. Experiments were subjected to two moisture regimes: continuously moist and dry–wet cycles. Sediment and porewater samples were collected through the incubation and analyzed for N and C species, as well as the quantification of nitrifying and denitrifying genes (amoA, nirS, nirK). C- and N-rich watershed sources experienced decomposition, mineralization, and nitrification and released large amounts of dissolved N, but the amount of N released varied depending on the PN source and moisture regime. Drying and rewetting stimulated nitrification and suppressed denitrification in most PN sources. Storm deposits released large amounts of porewater N regardless of the moisture conditions, indicating that they could readily act as N sources under a variety of conditions. The inputs, processing, and leaching of large, storm-driven PN inputs become increasingly important as the frequency and intensity of large storms is predicted to increase with global climate change. View Full-Text
Keywords: nitrogen; particulate organic matter; fluvial deposition; storms; mineralization; nitrification; denitrification; water quality; floodplain nitrogen; particulate organic matter; fluvial deposition; storms; mineralization; nitrification; denitrification; water quality; floodplain
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MDPI and ACS Style

Krieg, C.; Johnson, E.; Peck, E.; Kan, J.; Inamdar, S. After the Storm: Fate and Leaching of Particulate Nitrogen (PN) in the Fluvial Network and the Influence of Watershed Sources and Moisture Conditions. Water 2021, 13, 3182. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223182

AMA Style

Krieg C, Johnson E, Peck E, Kan J, Inamdar S. After the Storm: Fate and Leaching of Particulate Nitrogen (PN) in the Fluvial Network and the Influence of Watershed Sources and Moisture Conditions. Water. 2021; 13(22):3182. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223182

Chicago/Turabian Style

Krieg, Chelsea, Erin Johnson, Erin Peck, Jinjun Kan, and Shreeram Inamdar. 2021. "After the Storm: Fate and Leaching of Particulate Nitrogen (PN) in the Fluvial Network and the Influence of Watershed Sources and Moisture Conditions" Water 13, no. 22: 3182. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223182

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