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Article

Telecoupled Groundwaters: New Ways to Investigate Increasingly De-Localized Resources

1
Institute for Social-Ecological Research (ISOE), 60486 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
2
Institute of Physical Geography, Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
3
Institute for Environmental Sciences, University Koblenz Landau, 76829 Landau, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Viviana Re and Theresa Frommen
Water 2021, 13(20), 2906; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202906
Received: 16 August 2021 / Revised: 9 October 2021 / Accepted: 14 October 2021 / Published: 16 October 2021
Groundwater is essential for drinking water provision and food production while hosting unique biodiversity and delivering key ecosystem services. However, overexploitation and contamination are prevailing threats in many regions worldwide. Even integrated governance schemes like the European Union Water Framework Directive often fail to ensure good quality and quantity conditions of groundwater bodies. Contributing factors are knowledge gaps on groundwater characteristics, limited financial, staff and land resources, as well as policy incoherencies. In this paper, we go further and argue that current groundwater challenges cannot be understood when considering the local situation within hydrologic boundaries only. New long-distance processes are at stake—so called telecouplings—that transgress watershed and administrative boundaries and significantly influence the state of local groundwater bodies. We provide three literature-based examples of European groundwater systems that are impacted by telecouplings, and we show how research and solution perspectives may change when acknowledging the de-localization of groundwater(s). We elaborate on virtual water trade, remote water supply, and seasonal tourist flows that connect sending, receiving and spillover systems. These processes can induce groundwater depletion and contamination but may also help to conserve the resource. Our hypothesis calls for a new spatial paradigm to groundwater management and highlights the need for transdisciplinary research approaches as envisioned in socio-hydrogeology. View Full-Text
Keywords: interdisciplinarity; sustainable groundwater management; water framework directive; social-ecological systems; socio-hydrogeology interdisciplinarity; sustainable groundwater management; water framework directive; social-ecological systems; socio-hydrogeology
MDPI and ACS Style

Luetkemeier, R.; Frick-Trzebitzky, F.; Hodžić, D.; Jäger, A.; Kuhn, D.; Söller, L. Telecoupled Groundwaters: New Ways to Investigate Increasingly De-Localized Resources. Water 2021, 13, 2906. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202906

AMA Style

Luetkemeier R, Frick-Trzebitzky F, Hodžić D, Jäger A, Kuhn D, Söller L. Telecoupled Groundwaters: New Ways to Investigate Increasingly De-Localized Resources. Water. 2021; 13(20):2906. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202906

Chicago/Turabian Style

Luetkemeier, Robert, Fanny Frick-Trzebitzky, Dženeta Hodžić, Anne Jäger, David Kuhn, and Linda Söller. 2021. "Telecoupled Groundwaters: New Ways to Investigate Increasingly De-Localized Resources" Water 13, no. 20: 2906. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202906

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