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Article

Wood Retention at Inclined Bar Screens: Effect of Wood Characteristics on Backwater Rise and Bedload Transport

1
ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Glaciology (VAW), 8093 Zurich, Switzerland
2
Institute of Earth Surface Dynamics (IDYST), Faculty of Geosciences and the Environment, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Bommanna Krishnappan
Water 2021, 13(16), 2231; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13162231
Received: 29 June 2021 / Revised: 11 August 2021 / Accepted: 12 August 2021 / Published: 16 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Large Wood on River Ecosystems)
In forested mountain catchment areas, both bedload and large wood (LW) can be transported during ordinary flows. Retention structures such as sediment traps or racks are built to mitigate potential hazards downstream. Up to now, the design of these retention structures focuses on either LW or bedload. In addition, the majority of LW retention racks tend to retain both LW and bedload, while bedload transport continuity during ordinary flows is an important aspect to be considered in the design. Therefore, a series of flume experiments was conducted to study the effect of LW accumulations at an inclined bar screen with a bottom clearance on backwater rise and bedload transport. The main focus was put on testing different LW characteristics such as LW size, density, fine material, and shape (branches and rootwads), as well as a sequenced flood. The results demonstrated that a few logs (wood volume of ≈ 7 m3 prototype scale with a model scale factor of 30) are sufficient to reduce the bedload transport capacity to below 75% compared to the condition without LW. Fine material and smaller wood sizes further reduced bedload transport and increased backwater rise. In contrast, LW density and LW shape had a negligible effect. The test focusing on a sequenced flood highlighted the need for maintenance measures to avoid self-flushing of the bed material. The results of this study further indicate that an inclined bar screen may need to be adapted by considering LW characteristics in the design of the bottom clearance to enable bedload continuity during ordinary flows. View Full-Text
Keywords: bedload transport; flood protection; hydraulic structures; large wood (LW); river engineering bedload transport; flood protection; hydraulic structures; large wood (LW); river engineering
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schalko, I.; Ruiz-Villanueva, V.; Maager, F.; Weitbrecht, V. Wood Retention at Inclined Bar Screens: Effect of Wood Characteristics on Backwater Rise and Bedload Transport. Water 2021, 13, 2231. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13162231

AMA Style

Schalko I, Ruiz-Villanueva V, Maager F, Weitbrecht V. Wood Retention at Inclined Bar Screens: Effect of Wood Characteristics on Backwater Rise and Bedload Transport. Water. 2021; 13(16):2231. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13162231

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schalko, Isabella, Virginia Ruiz-Villanueva, Fiona Maager, and Volker Weitbrecht. 2021. "Wood Retention at Inclined Bar Screens: Effect of Wood Characteristics on Backwater Rise and Bedload Transport" Water 13, no. 16: 2231. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13162231

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