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Article

Reassessing Existing Reservoir Supply Capacity and Management Resilience under Climate Change and Sediment Deposition

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Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Patras, 265 04 Patras, Greece
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Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Patras, 265 04 Patras, Greece
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Achim A. Beylich
Water 2021, 13(13), 1819; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131819
Received: 25 May 2021 / Revised: 24 June 2021 / Accepted: 26 June 2021 / Published: 30 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Hydrology)
Freshwater resources are limited and seasonally and spatially unevenly distributed. Thus, in water resources management plans, storage reservoirs play a vital role in safeguarding drinking, irrigation, hydropower and livestock water supply. In the last decades, the dams’ negative effects, such as fragmentation of water flow and sediment transport, are considered in decision-making, for achieving an optimal balance between human needs and healthy riverine and coastal ecosystems. Currently, operation of existing reservoirs is challenged by increasing water demand, climate change effects and active storage reduction due to sediment deposition, jeopardizing their supply capacity. This paper proposes a methodological framework to reassess supply capacity and management resilience for an existing reservoir under these challenges. Future projections are derived by plausible climate scenarios and global climate models and by stochastic simulation of historic data. An alternative basic reservoir management scenario with a very low exceedance probability is derived. Excess water volumes are investigated under a probabilistic prism for enabling multiple-purpose water demands. Finally, this method is showcased to the Ladhon Reservoir (Greece). The probable total benefit from water allocated to the various water uses is estimated to assist decision makers in examining the tradeoffs between the probable additional benefit and risk of exceedance. View Full-Text
Keywords: reservoir management; reservoir operation; climate change; sediment deposition; reservoir storage capacity reservoir management; reservoir operation; climate change; sediment deposition; reservoir storage capacity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bekri, E.S.; Economou, P.; Yannopoulos, P.C.; Demetracopoulos, A.C. Reassessing Existing Reservoir Supply Capacity and Management Resilience under Climate Change and Sediment Deposition. Water 2021, 13, 1819. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131819

AMA Style

Bekri ES, Economou P, Yannopoulos PC, Demetracopoulos AC. Reassessing Existing Reservoir Supply Capacity and Management Resilience under Climate Change and Sediment Deposition. Water. 2021; 13(13):1819. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131819

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bekri, Eleni S., Polychronis Economou, Panayotis C. Yannopoulos, and Alexander C. Demetracopoulos 2021. "Reassessing Existing Reservoir Supply Capacity and Management Resilience under Climate Change and Sediment Deposition" Water 13, no. 13: 1819. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131819

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