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Article

Economic Contribution Analysis of National Estuarine Research Reserves

1
Eastern Research Group, Inc., 110 Hartwell Ave, Lexington, MA 02421, USA
2
NOAA Office for Coastal Management, 2234 South Hobson Ave, Charleston, SC 29405, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Robert C. Burns and Danielle Schwarzmann
Water 2021, 13(11), 1596; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111596
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 28 May 2021 / Accepted: 2 June 2021 / Published: 5 June 2021
Increased attention to the value of protected natural areas has led to the proliferation of ecosystem service valuations for coastal habitats. However, these studies do not provide a full representation of the economic value of these habitats. Protected coastal environments, such as the National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS), add jobs and revenue to their local communities. Institutions such as NERRS provide economic contributions that extend beyond their operational spending and jobs they provide. Spending by reserves and their partners ripples throughout the economy. We performed an economic contribution analysis at four pilot sites using input-output modeling through IMPLAN. Sites contributed millions in revenue and tens to hundreds of jobs in their respective regions. Each of the four sites had a different category of spending that was the largest contributor of revenue and jobs, which is likely due to the community context and location of the reserves. Understanding these contributions is helpful in validating funding for NERRS. Communicating these contributions along with ecosystem service values may increase support from community members who otherwise do not use or rely on NERRS as much as traditional reserve supporters. View Full-Text
Keywords: economic contribution analysis; research reserves; input-output modeling; economic communications economic contribution analysis; research reserves; input-output modeling; economic communications
MDPI and ACS Style

Stokes-Cawley, O.; Stroud, H.; Lyons, D.; Wiley, P.; Goodhue, C. Economic Contribution Analysis of National Estuarine Research Reserves. Water 2021, 13, 1596. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111596

AMA Style

Stokes-Cawley O, Stroud H, Lyons D, Wiley P, Goodhue C. Economic Contribution Analysis of National Estuarine Research Reserves. Water. 2021; 13(11):1596. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111596

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stokes-Cawley, Owen, Hannah Stroud, Douglas Lyons, Peter Wiley, and Charles Goodhue. 2021. "Economic Contribution Analysis of National Estuarine Research Reserves" Water 13, no. 11: 1596. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111596

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