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Article

Sediment Nutrient Flux Rates in a Shallow, Turbid Lake Are More Dependent on Water Quality Than Lake Depth

1
Department of Biology, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505, USA
2
Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Memphis Environmental Field Office, Barlett, TN 38133, USA
3
USDA-ARS National Sedimentation Laboratory, Oxford, MS 38655, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Giuseppe Mancini
Water 2021, 13(10), 1344; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13101344
Received: 18 March 2021 / Revised: 1 May 2021 / Accepted: 5 May 2021 / Published: 12 May 2021
The bottom sediments of shallow lakes are an important nutrient sink; however, turbidity may alter the influence of water depth on sediment nutrient uptake by reducing light and associated oxic processes, or altering nutrient availability. This study assessed the relative influence of water quality vs. water depth on sediment nutrient uptake rates in a shallow agricultural lake during spring, when sediment and nutrient loading are highest. Nitrate and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) flux rates were measured from sediment cores collected across a depth and spatial gradient, and correlated to water quality. Overlying water depth and distance to shore did not influence rates. Both nitrate and SRP sediment uptake rates increased with greater Secchi depth and higher water temperature, and nitrate and SRP rates increased with lower water total N and total P, respectively. The importance of water temperature on N and P cycling was confirmed in an additional experiment; however, different patterns of nitrate reduction and denitrification suggest that alternative N2 production pathways may be important. These results suggest that water quality and temperature can be key drivers of sediment nutrient flux in a shallow, eutrophic, turbid lake, and water depth manipulation may be less important for maximizing spring runoff nutrient retention than altering water quality entering the lake. View Full-Text
Keywords: agriculture; eutrophication; denitrification; lake depth; sediment; temperature agriculture; eutrophication; denitrification; lake depth; sediment; temperature
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MDPI and ACS Style

Evans, J.L.; Murdock, J.N.; Taylor, J.M.; Lizotte, R.E., Jr. Sediment Nutrient Flux Rates in a Shallow, Turbid Lake Are More Dependent on Water Quality Than Lake Depth. Water 2021, 13, 1344. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13101344

AMA Style

Evans JL, Murdock JN, Taylor JM, Lizotte RE Jr.. Sediment Nutrient Flux Rates in a Shallow, Turbid Lake Are More Dependent on Water Quality Than Lake Depth. Water. 2021; 13(10):1344. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13101344

Chicago/Turabian Style

Evans, Jordan L., Justin N. Murdock, Jason M. Taylor, and Richard E. Lizotte Jr. 2021. "Sediment Nutrient Flux Rates in a Shallow, Turbid Lake Are More Dependent on Water Quality Than Lake Depth" Water 13, no. 10: 1344. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13101344

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