Next Article in Journal
Temporal and Spatial Variations of Precipitation Change from Southeast to Northwest China during the Period 1961–2017
Next Article in Special Issue
Temporal Dynamics of Fish Assemblages as a Reflection of Policy Shift from Fishing Concession to Co-Management in One of the World’s Largest Tropical Flood Pulse Fisheries
Previous Article in Journal
Design, Development, and Performance Evaluation of a Fertigation Device for Distributing Solid Fertilizer
Previous Article in Special Issue
Cambodian Freshwater Fish Assemblage Structure and Distribution Patterns: Using a Large-Scale Monitoring Network to Understand the Dynamics and Management Implications of Species Clusters in a Global Biodiversity Hotspot
Open AccessArticle

Patterns of Mekong Mollusc Biodiversity: Identification of Emerging Threats and Importance to Management and Livelihoods in a Region of Globally Significant Biodiversity and Endemism

1
Graduate School, Chea Sim University of Kamchaymear, No. 157, Preah Norodom Blvd, Khan Chamkarmon, Phnom Penh 12300, Cambodia
2
Centre for Biodiversity Conservation, Royal University of Phnom Penh, Russian Boulevard, Phnom Penh 12000, Cambodia
3
Wonders of the Mekong Project, c/o IFReD, No. 186, Preah Norodom Blvd., Khan Chamcar Morn, Phnom Penh 12300, Cambodia
4
Inland Fisheries Research and Development Institute (IFReDI), Fisheries Administration, No. 186, Preah Norodom Blvd., Khan Chamkar Morn, Phnom Penh 12300, Cambodia
5
Aquatic Ecology Research Group, Ghent University, Campus Coupure Building F, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
6
Provincial Centre of Environmental Research, Godshuizenlaan 95, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
7
SEVAB Doctoral School, Laboratoire Evolution & Diversité Biologique, Université Paul Sabatier—Toulouse III, UMR 5174, 118 route de Narbonne, CEDEX 4, 31062 Toulouse, France
8
Global Water Center & Department of Biology, University of Nevada, 1664 N. Virginia Street, Reno, NV 89557, USA
9
Department of Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(9), 2619; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12092619
Received: 12 August 2020 / Revised: 6 September 2020 / Accepted: 11 September 2020 / Published: 18 September 2020
The Lower Mekong Basin (LMB) is a key biodiversity hotspot. To facilitate conservation and management, we examine mollusc biodiversity patterns and distribution along LMB’s longitudinal gradients, identify environmental drivers, and discuss the importance of these drivers to management. Cluster analysis, redundancy analysis (RDA), and variation partitioning were conducted using mollusc data collected from 63 sampling sites. Results indicated that species diversity is dominated by gastropods (61%) and bivalves (39%) and feeding trait diversity by scrapers (52%) and filter-collectors (37%). Only 48 species (49%) out of 98 taxa have been assessed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) including a growing number of invasive species. The lack of complete, up-to-date information highlights the need for more research on both native and alien species. Cluster analysis revealed a clear mollusc biodiversity structure along the LMB’s longitudinal segments. Diversity was lowest in upstream tributaries, increased in upstream main channels, and was highest in downstream channels and the Mekong delta, the exception being the observed high gastropod abundance in Chi-Mun river mouth and Luang Prabang areas. The RDA and variation partitioning demonstrated that combined physical–chemical and climatic conditions are the key drivers of biodiversity patterns. Given the potential spread of invasive alien species and increasing anthropogenic impacts, further ecological research, regular monitoring, and adaptive management are needed to sustain mollusc biodiversity and associated ecosystem services, which contribute to food security, nutrition, and livelihoods in the LMB. View Full-Text
Keywords: climatic factor; river physical–chemical condition; functional feeding groups; conservation status; river management; macroinvertebrates communities; bivalves; gastropods climatic factor; river physical–chemical condition; functional feeding groups; conservation status; river management; macroinvertebrates communities; bivalves; gastropods
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sor, R.; Ngor, P.B.; Boets, P.; Goethals, P.L.M.; Lek, S.; Hogan, Z.S.; Park, Y.-S. Patterns of Mekong Mollusc Biodiversity: Identification of Emerging Threats and Importance to Management and Livelihoods in a Region of Globally Significant Biodiversity and Endemism. Water 2020, 12, 2619.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop