Next Article in Journal
Studying the Effect of Channel Geometry on Different Water Quality Variables for Effective Designs and Waste Allocation Plans for Waterways
Next Article in Special Issue
Impact of Climate Change on the Frequency of Dynamic Breakup Events and on the Risk of Ice-Jam Floods in Quebec, Canada
Previous Article in Journal
Relative Sea-Level Rise and Potential Submersion Risk for 2100 on 16 Coastal Plains of the Mediterranean Sea
Previous Article in Special Issue
Shift Detection in Hydrological Regimes and Pluriannual Low-Frequency Streamflow Forecasting Using the Hidden Markov Model
Article

New Zealand River Hydrology under Late 21st Century Climate Change

1
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 8602, Christchurch 8440, New Zealand
2
Department of Environmental Management, Lincoln University, Lincoln 7647, New Zealand
Water 2020, 12(8), 2175; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082175
Received: 18 June 2020 / Revised: 20 July 2020 / Accepted: 30 July 2020 / Published: 1 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrology of Rivers and Lakes under Climate Change)
Climate change is increasingly affecting the water cycle and as freshwater plays a vital role in countries’ societal and environmental well-being it is important to develop national assessments of potential climate change impacts. Focussing on New Zealand, a climate-hydrology model cascade is used to project hydrological impacts of late 21st century climate change at 43,862 river locations across the country for seven hydrological metrics. Mean annual and seasonal river flows validate well across the whole model cascade, and the mean annual floods to a lesser extent, while low flows exhibit a large positive bias. Model projections show large swathes of non-significant effects across the country due to interannual variability and climate model uncertainty. Where changes are significant, mean annual, autumn, and spring flows increase along the west and south and decrease in the north and east. The largest and most extensive increases occur during winter, while during summer decreasing flows outnumber increasing. The mean annual flood increases more in the south, while mean annual low flows show both increases and decreases. These hydrological changes are likely to have important long-term implications for New Zealand’s societal, cultural, economic, and environmental well-being. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; river flow; national modelling; validation; New Zealand climate change; river flow; national modelling; validation; New Zealand
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Collins, D.B.G. New Zealand River Hydrology under Late 21st Century Climate Change. Water 2020, 12, 2175. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082175

AMA Style

Collins DBG. New Zealand River Hydrology under Late 21st Century Climate Change. Water. 2020; 12(8):2175. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082175

Chicago/Turabian Style

Collins, Daniel B.G. 2020. "New Zealand River Hydrology under Late 21st Century Climate Change" Water 12, no. 8: 2175. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082175

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop