Next Article in Journal
Response of LUCC on Runoff Generation Process in Middle Yellow River Basin: The Gushanchuan Basin
Next Article in Special Issue
Chemical Clogging and Evolution of Head Losses in Steel Slag Filters Used for Phosphorus Removal
Previous Article in Journal
Study on the Transport of Terrestrial Dissolved Substances in the Pearl River Estuary Using Passive Tracers
Previous Article in Special Issue
Performance of Field-Scale Phosphorus Removal Structures Utilizing Steel Slag for Treatment of Subsurface Drainage
 
 
Article

Using Steel Slag for Dissolved Phosphorus Removal: Insights from a Designed Flow-Through Laboratory Experimental Structure

1
Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China
2
National Soil Erosion Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, West Lafayette, IN 47906, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(5), 1236; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051236
Received: 19 March 2020 / Revised: 21 April 2020 / Accepted: 22 April 2020 / Published: 26 April 2020
Steel slag, a byproduct of the steel making process, has been adopted as a material to reduce non-point phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land. Although substantial studies have been conducted on characterizing P removed by steel slag, few data are available on the removal of P under different conditions of P input, slag mass, and retention time (RT). The objective of this study was to investigate P removal efficiency as impacted by slag mass and RT at different physical locations through a horizontal steel slag column. Downstream slag segments were more efficient at removing P than upstream segments because they were exposed to more favorable conditions for calcium phosphate precipitation, specifically higher Ca2+ concentrations and pH. These results showed that P is removed in a moving front as Ca2+ and slag pH buffer capacity are consumed. In agreement with the calcium phosphate precipitation mechanism shown in previous studies, an increase in RT increased P removal, resulting in an estimated removal capacity of 61 mg kg−1 at a RT of 30 min. Results emphasized the importance of designing field scale structures with sufficient RT to accommodate the formation of calcium phosphate. View Full-Text
Keywords: phosphorus removal, steel slag; retention time; calcium concentration; multi-segments phosphorus removal, steel slag; retention time; calcium concentration; multi-segments
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, L.; Penn, C.; Huang, C.-h.; Livingston, S.; Yan, J. Using Steel Slag for Dissolved Phosphorus Removal: Insights from a Designed Flow-Through Laboratory Experimental Structure. Water 2020, 12, 1236. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051236

AMA Style

Wang L, Penn C, Huang C-h, Livingston S, Yan J. Using Steel Slag for Dissolved Phosphorus Removal: Insights from a Designed Flow-Through Laboratory Experimental Structure. Water. 2020; 12(5):1236. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051236

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wang, Linhua, Chad Penn, Chi-hua Huang, Stan Livingston, and Junhua Yan. 2020. "Using Steel Slag for Dissolved Phosphorus Removal: Insights from a Designed Flow-Through Laboratory Experimental Structure" Water 12, no. 5: 1236. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051236

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop