Next Article in Journal
Spatiotemporal Variation in Precipitation during Rainy Season in Beibu Gulf, South China, from 1961 to 2016
Next Article in Special Issue
Acquisition of Post-Depositional Effects on Stable Isotopes (δ18O and δD) of Snow and Firn at Dome A, East Antarctica
Previous Article in Journal
Seasonal Succession of Phytoplankton Functional Groups and Driving Factors of Cyanobacterial Blooms in a Subtropical Reservoir in South China
 
 
Article

Rainstorm Magnitude Likely Regulates Event Water Fraction and Its Transit Time in Mesoscale Mountainous Catchments: Implication for Modelling Parameterization

1
Department of Geography, National Taiwan University, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan
2
Department of Geography, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei City 10610, Taiwan
3
Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung City 40227, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(4), 1169; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041169
Received: 11 March 2020 / Revised: 8 April 2020 / Accepted: 16 April 2020 / Published: 19 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Isotope Hydrology)
Event water transit time estimation has rarely been done for violent rainstorms (e.g., typhoons) in steep and fractured mountainous catchments where the range of transit time, potential controlling factors, and the validity of time-invariant parametrization are unclear. Characterized by steep landscape and torrential typhoon rainfall, Taiwan provides great opportunities for inquiring into the above questions. In this study, the hydrometrics and δ18O in rainwater and streamwater were sampled with a ~3-h interval for six typhoon events in two mesoscale catchments. The TRANSEP (transfer function hydrograph separation) model and global sensitivity analysis were applied for estimating mean transit time (MTTew) and fraction (Few) of event water and identifying the chronosequent parameter sensitivity. Results showed that the MTTew and Few varied from 2.0 to 11.0 h and from 0.2 to 0.8, respectively. Our MTTew in the mesoscale catchments is comparable with that in microscale catchments, showing a fast rainfall-runoff transfer in our steep catchments. The average rainfall intensity is a predominant indicator, which negatively affects the MTTew and positively affects the Few, likely activating preferential flow-paths and quickly transferring event water to the stream. Sensitivity analysis among inter- and intra-events demonstrates that parameter sensitivity is event-dependent and time-variant. A quick and massive subsurface flow without distinct mixing with groundwater would be triggered during large rainstorms, suggesting that time-variant parameterization should be particularly considered when estimating the MTTew in steep and fractured catchments at rainstorm scale. View Full-Text
Keywords: travel time; event water; isotopic tracer; sensitivity analysis; Taiwan travel time; event water; isotopic tracer; sensitivity analysis; Taiwan
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, J.-Y.; Shih, Y.-T.; Lan, C.-Y.; Lee, T.-Y.; Peng, T.-R.; Lee, C.-T.; Huang, J.-C. Rainstorm Magnitude Likely Regulates Event Water Fraction and Its Transit Time in Mesoscale Mountainous Catchments: Implication for Modelling Parameterization. Water 2020, 12, 1169. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041169

AMA Style

Lee J-Y, Shih Y-T, Lan C-Y, Lee T-Y, Peng T-R, Lee C-T, Huang J-C. Rainstorm Magnitude Likely Regulates Event Water Fraction and Its Transit Time in Mesoscale Mountainous Catchments: Implication for Modelling Parameterization. Water. 2020; 12(4):1169. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041169

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lee, Jun-Yi, Yu-Ting Shih, Chiao-Ying Lan, Tsung-Yu Lee, Tsung-Ren Peng, Cheing-Tung Lee, and Jr-Chuan Huang. 2020. "Rainstorm Magnitude Likely Regulates Event Water Fraction and Its Transit Time in Mesoscale Mountainous Catchments: Implication for Modelling Parameterization" Water 12, no. 4: 1169. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041169

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop