Next Article in Journal
Structural Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter in Permafrost Peatland Lakes
Next Article in Special Issue
Transferrable Principles to Revolutionize Drinking Water Governance in First Nation Communities in Canada
Previous Article in Journal
Short-Term River Flow Forecasting Framework and Its Application in Cold Climatic Regions
Previous Article in Special Issue
Moving towards Effective First Nations’ Source Water Protection: Barriers, Opportunities, and a Framework
Article

An Indigenous Research Methodology That Employs Anishinaabek Elders, Language Speakers and Women’s Knowledge for Sustainable Water Governance

by
Faculty of Environmental Studies and Urban Change, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
Also known as Ogamauh Annag Qwe in Anishinaabemowin.
Water 2020, 12(11), 3058; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113058
Received: 31 July 2020 / Revised: 23 October 2020 / Accepted: 28 October 2020 / Published: 31 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Water Governance through Indigenous Research Approaches)
Indigenous research paradigms are congruent to Indigenous worldviews and have become more dominant in areas such as Indigenous policy and education. As Indigenous research paradigms continue to gain momentum, the historical legacy of unethical research is addressed as more Indigenous communities and organizations develop their own research protocols. There is a plethora of articles explaining Indigenous research methodologies, but few examine the inclusion of the knowledge from Elders, language speakers, and Indigenous women in sustainable water governance. My Indigenous research methodology draws on the works of Indigenous scholars Shawn Wilson, Linda Smith, and Margaret Kovach, with specific focus on Wendy Geniusz’s Biskaabiiyang. My Indigenous research methodology is specific to the Anishinaabe territory of the Great Lakes region and includes Anishinaabek Elders, Anishinaabemowin (Ojibway language) speakers, and Anishinaabek women. This article seeks to contribute to Indigenous research paradigms and methods by elucidating the importance of engaging Anishinaabek Elders, Anishinaabemowin speakers, and Anishinaabek women in sustainable water governance. View Full-Text
Keywords: worldview; responsibility; respect; colonialization; relationality worldview; responsibility; respect; colonialization; relationality
MDPI and ACS Style

Chiblow, S. An Indigenous Research Methodology That Employs Anishinaabek Elders, Language Speakers and Women’s Knowledge for Sustainable Water Governance. Water 2020, 12, 3058. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113058

AMA Style

Chiblow S. An Indigenous Research Methodology That Employs Anishinaabek Elders, Language Speakers and Women’s Knowledge for Sustainable Water Governance. Water. 2020; 12(11):3058. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113058

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chiblow, Susan. 2020. "An Indigenous Research Methodology That Employs Anishinaabek Elders, Language Speakers and Women’s Knowledge for Sustainable Water Governance" Water 12, no. 11: 3058. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113058

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop