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Moving towards Effective First Nations’ Source Water Protection: Barriers, Opportunities, and a Framework

1
School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
2
Chippewas of Nawash Unceded First Nation, Wiarton, ON N0H 2T0, Canada
3
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(11), 2957; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12112957
Received: 29 July 2020 / Revised: 11 September 2020 / Accepted: 12 October 2020 / Published: 22 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Water Governance through Indigenous Research Approaches)
It is well known that watershed-based source water protection programs are integral to the provision of clean drinking water. However, the involvement of Indigenous communities in these programs is very limited in Canada, which has contributed to the vulnerability of Indigenous source waters to contamination. Through a partnership with an Anishinaabe community, this research aimed to identify challenges and opportunities for communities and practitioners to improve the protection of Indigenous source waters in the province of Ontario. The methodology followed the Indigenous research principles of relationship, respect, relevance, reciprocity, and responsibility. Interviews and a youth focus group were conducted with Indigenous community members and practitioners from industry, academia, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and government. Analysis was conducted using an iterative process to develop codes and themes in the qualitative data analysis software NVivo. Results indicated that issues with scale, jurisdiction, the concept of source water protection, representation, funding, and capacity impact efforts to protect Indigenous source waters. Hopeful recent developments and upcoming opportunities were identified, and a water protection framework for First Nation communities in Ontario was developed in partnership with an Anishinaabe water protection committee. Recommendations are provided to multiple sectors for moving forward respectfully, and effectively, towards the protection of Indigenous waters. View Full-Text
Keywords: indigenous knowledge; indigenous peoples; source water protection; water security; water governance indigenous knowledge; indigenous peoples; source water protection; water security; water governance
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MDPI and ACS Style

Marshall, R.; Desjardine, M.; Levison, J.; Anderson, K.; McBean, E. Moving towards Effective First Nations’ Source Water Protection: Barriers, Opportunities, and a Framework. Water 2020, 12, 2957. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12112957

AMA Style

Marshall R, Desjardine M, Levison J, Anderson K, McBean E. Moving towards Effective First Nations’ Source Water Protection: Barriers, Opportunities, and a Framework. Water. 2020; 12(11):2957. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12112957

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marshall, Rachael; Desjardine, Michele; Levison, Jana; Anderson, Kim; McBean, Edward. 2020. "Moving towards Effective First Nations’ Source Water Protection: Barriers, Opportunities, and a Framework" Water 12, no. 11: 2957. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12112957

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