Next Article in Journal
Energy Sorghum Production under Arid and Semi-Arid Environments of Texas
Previous Article in Journal
Field Investigation on River Hydrochemical Characteristics and Larval and Juvenile Fish in the Source Region of the Yangtze River
Open AccessReview

Riparian Land-Use Impacts on Stream Bank and Gully Erosion in Agricultural Watersheds: What We Have Learned

1
Laboratory of Management and Control of Mountainous Waters, Department of Forestry and Natural Environment, International Hellenic University, 1st km Drama- Microhoriou, Drama 66100, Greece
2
Faculty of Forestry, Artvin Coruh University, Artvin 08000, Turkey
3
Natural Resource Ecology and Management Department, Iowa State University, 339 Science Hall II, Ames, IA 50011, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(7), 1343; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11071343
Received: 21 May 2019 / Revised: 18 June 2019 / Accepted: 24 June 2019 / Published: 28 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination)
Stream bank and gully erosion are major sources of nonpoint source pollutants, especially in landscapes dominated by agriculture. Implementation of upland conservation practices in landscapes dominated by agriculture reduces upland sediment transport more than water runoff, leading to excessive stream bank and gully erosion. This review focus on ten different studies conducted in streams in Iowa that investigated riparian land-use impacts on stream banks, gullies, and other riparian sediment sources (cattle loafing areas and cattle stream access points). The riparian land-uses investigated were riparian forest buffers; grass filters; continuous, rotational, and intensive rotational pastures; pastures with cattle fenced out of the stream; and row-cropped fields. Results of these studies indicate that maintaining perennial deep-rooted vegetation in riparian areas and excluding cattle from the stream channel stabilizes stream banks and gullies. Cattle loafing areas and cattle stream access points appear to also be important sediment sources. Re-establishing perennial riparian vegetation is a sustainable and cost-effective conservation practice because it reduces sediment in streams while maintaining the majority of the watershed in agricultural production. The limited available funds for the implementation of holistic watershed conservation practices suggest using targeted approaches, at the watershed scale, to improve conservation practice effectiveness. View Full-Text
Keywords: agricultural landscapes; conservation practices; cattle loafing areas; cattle stream access points agricultural landscapes; conservation practices; cattle loafing areas; cattle stream access points
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Zaimes, G.N.; Tufekcioglu, M.; Schultz, R.C. Riparian Land-Use Impacts on Stream Bank and Gully Erosion in Agricultural Watersheds: What We Have Learned. Water 2019, 11, 1343. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11071343

AMA Style

Zaimes GN, Tufekcioglu M, Schultz RC. Riparian Land-Use Impacts on Stream Bank and Gully Erosion in Agricultural Watersheds: What We Have Learned. Water. 2019; 11(7):1343. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11071343

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zaimes, George N.; Tufekcioglu, Mustafa; Schultz, Richard C. 2019. "Riparian Land-Use Impacts on Stream Bank and Gully Erosion in Agricultural Watersheds: What We Have Learned" Water 11, no. 7: 1343. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11071343

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop