Next Article in Journal
A New Uncertainty Measure for Assessing the Uncertainty Existing in Hydrological Simulation
Next Article in Special Issue
The Legal Geographies of Water Claims: Seawater Desalination in Mining Regions in Chile
Previous Article in Journal
Modelling Phosphorus Sorption Kinetics and the Longevity of Reactive Filter Materials Used for On-Site Wastewater Treatment
Previous Article in Special Issue
(Re)theorizing the Politics of Bottled Water: Water Insecurity in the Context of Weak Regulatory Regimes
Article Menu
Issue 4 (April) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Whose Rules? A Water Justice Critique of the OECD’s 12 Principles on Water Governance

1
Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
2
School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(4), 809; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040809
Received: 10 December 2018 / Revised: 1 April 2019 / Accepted: 5 April 2019 / Published: 18 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Governance: Retheorizing Politics)
  |  
PDF [246 KB, uploaded 18 April 2019]

Abstract

The article constructively critiques the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) 12 Principles on Water Governance (the OECD Principles). The human rights standard, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), provided the foundation for conceptualizing Indigenous water rights. The analysis used a modification of Zwarteveen and Boelens’ 2014 framework of the four echelons of water contestation. The analysis indicates that the OECD Principles assume state authority over water governance, make invisible Indigenous peoples’ own water governance systems and perpetuate the discourses of water colonialism. Drawing on Indigenous peoples’ water declarations, the Anishinaabe ‘Seven Grandfathers’ as water governance principles and Haudenosaunee examples, we demonstrate that the OECD Principles privilege certain understandings of water over others, reinforcing the dominant discourses of water as a resource and water governance based on extractive relationships with water. Reconciling the OECD Principles with UNDRIP’s human rights standard promotes Indigenous water justice. One option is to develop a reinterpretation of the OECD Principles. A second, potentially more substantive option is to review and reform the OECD Principles. A reform might consider adding a new dimension, ‘water justice,’ to the OECD Principles. Before reinterpretation or reform can occur, broader input is needed, and inclusion of Indigenous peoples into that process. View Full-Text
Keywords: First Nations; OECD; water governance; water justice; water colonialism; UNDRIP; UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples First Nations; OECD; water governance; water justice; water colonialism; UNDRIP; UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Taylor, K.S.; Longboat, S.; Grafton, R.Q. Whose Rules? A Water Justice Critique of the OECD’s 12 Principles on Water Governance. Water 2019, 11, 809.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top