Next Article in Journal
An Ensemble Decomposition-Based Artificial Intelligence Approach for Daily Streamflow Prediction
Next Article in Special Issue
Estuarine Macrofauna Affects Benthic Biogeochemistry in a Hypertrophic Lagoon
Previous Article in Journal
Statistical Analysis of Extreme Events in Precipitation, Stream Discharge, and Groundwater Head Fluctuation: Distribution, Memory, and Correlation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Contrasting Effects of an Alien Worm on Benthic N Cycling in Muddy and Sandy Sediments
Article Menu
Issue 4 (April) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Effects of Drying and Re-Wetting on Litter Decomposition and Nutrient Recycling: A Manipulative Experiment

1
Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma, 43124 Parma, Italy
2
Marine Research Institute, University of Klaipeda, 92294 Klaipeda, Lithuania
3
Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment, National Research Council, 20133 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(4), 708; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040708
Received: 4 February 2019 / Revised: 31 March 2019 / Accepted: 3 April 2019 / Published: 5 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Macrobiota in Aquatic Nutrient Cycling)
  |  
PDF [2321 KB, uploaded 18 April 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Climate change and water abstraction may change stream flow from perennial into intermittent lotic systems, modifying their abiotic and biotic benthic environment and impacting ecosystem processes such as nutrient turnover. We conducted a microcosm experiment to investigate the interactive effect of water intermittency, macrofauna and leaf size (Populus nigra leaves) on nutrient mineralization and recycling. Leaf disks (1 or 5 cm diameter) were incubated for 40 days with or without the leaf-consumer, Potamophylax cingulatus larvae (Trichoptera, Limnephilidae) and with or without an intervening, 10-days simulation of stream drying and subsequent rewetting. Nutrient fluxes, residual leaf biomass and leaf elemental composition were measured to evaluate how intermittency, macrofauna and leaf size affect organic matter mineralization rates and stoichiometry. Results suggest that drying slows decomposition rates, impacting both the microbial and setting to zero macrofauna activities. The presence of macrofauna increases mineralization and nutrient (C, N and P) regeneration rates. Our findings also suggest that leaf disks with higher diameter display higher microbial activity and NH4+ regeneration. During the experiment, the C:N:P ratios of residual litter changed, as the leaf material became enriched with N and P. Our study suggests that increasingly frequent dry events might slow mineralization rates and downstream nutrient transport. View Full-Text
Keywords: hydrologic intermittency; macrofauna; leaf size; mineralization; elemental composition; nutrient fluxes hydrologic intermittency; macrofauna; leaf size; mineralization; elemental composition; nutrient fluxes
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Palmia, B.; Bartoli, M.; Laini, A.; Bolpagni, R.; Ferrari, C.; Viaroli, P. Effects of Drying and Re-Wetting on Litter Decomposition and Nutrient Recycling: A Manipulative Experiment. Water 2019, 11, 708.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top