Next Article in Journal
Evaluation of Water Uptake and Root Distribution of Cherry Trees under Different Irrigation Methods
Next Article in Special Issue
Stranded Assets as a Key Concept to Guide Investment Strategies for Sustainable Development Goal 6
Previous Article in Journal
Generating Scenarios of Cross-Correlated Demands for Modelling Water Distribution Networks
Article Menu
Issue 3 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Understanding the Functionality and Burden on Decentralised Rural Water Supply: Influence of Millennium Development Goal 7c Coverage Targets

1
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ, UK
2
BASEflow, Galaxy House, Blantyre, Malawi
3
Department of Accounting and Finance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0QU, UK
4
Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Water Development, Government of Malawi, Tikwere House, Lilongwe, Malawi
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(3), 494; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030494
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 22 February 2019 / Accepted: 5 March 2019 / Published: 8 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Present and Future of Drinking Water Supplies in Low-Income Regions)
  |  
PDF [2371 KB, uploaded 8 March 2019]
  |     |  

Abstract

The sustainability of rural groundwater supply infrastructure, primarily boreholes fitted with hand pumps, remains a challenge. This study evaluates whether coverage targets set out within the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) inadvertently increased the challenge to sustainably manage water supply infrastructure. Furthermore, the drive towards decentralised service delivery contributes to the financial burden of water supply assets. A sample size of 14,943 Afridev hand pump boreholes was extracted from a comprehensive live data set of 68,984 water points across Malawi to investigate the sustainability burden as emphasis shifts to the 2030 agenda. The results demonstrate that the push for coverage within the MDG era has impacted the sustainability of assets. A lack of proactive approaches towards major repairs and sub-standard borehole construction alongside aging infrastructure contributes to reduced functionality of decentralised supplies. Furthermore, costly rehabilitation is required to bring assets to operational standards, in which external support is commonly relied upon. Acceleration towards the coverage targets has contributed towards unsustainable infrastructure that has further implications moving forward. These findings support the need for Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) investment planning to move from a focus on coverage targets to a focus on quality infrastructure and proactive monitoring approaches to reduce the future burden placed on communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: borehole; decentralisation; functionality; hand pump; low-income regions; maintenance; Malawi; rehabilitation; sustainability borehole; decentralisation; functionality; hand pump; low-income regions; maintenance; Malawi; rehabilitation; sustainability
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Truslove, J.P.; V. M. Miller, A.; Mannix, N.; Nhlema, M.; Rivett, M.O.; Coulson, A.B.; Mleta, P.; Kalin, R.M. Understanding the Functionality and Burden on Decentralised Rural Water Supply: Influence of Millennium Development Goal 7c Coverage Targets. Water 2019, 11, 494.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top