Next Article in Journal
Correction: Eldrup, M.R., et al. Stability of Rubble Mound Breakwaters—A Study of the Notional Permeability Factor, based on Physical Model Tests. Water 2019, 11, 934
Previous Article in Journal
Wastewater Management in Citrus Processing Industries: An Overview of Advantages and Limits
Open AccessReply

Response to Comments for “An Ecological Function Approach to Managing Harmful Cyanobacteria in Three Oregon Lakes: Beyond Water Quality Advisories and Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs)”, Water 2019, 11, 1125

1
USEPA Office of Research and Development, NERL, Systems Exposure Division (SED), Ecological and Human Community Analysis Branch, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
2
USEPA Region IX, WTR2, 75 Hawthorne St., San Francisco, CA 94105, USA
3
Aron Environmental Consulting, 5457 Marsh Hawk Way, Columbia, MD 21045, USA
4
Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology, University of Nevada, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, NV 89557, USA
5
U.S. Dept. of the Interior Bureau of Land Management, Montana/Dakotas State Office, 5001 Southgate Drive, Billings, MT 59101, USA
6
University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, 14 Ave. Universidad, Ste. 1401, San Juan, PR 00925-2534, USA
7
USEPA Office of Research and Development, NERL, Exposure Methods and Measurement Division (EMMD), Environmental Chemistry Branch, Las Vegas, NV 89119, USA
8
USEPA Office of Research and Development, NERL, Systems Exposure Division (SED), Ecosystem Integrity Branch, Las Vegas, NV 89119, USA
9
Gulf Coast STORET, LLC, 11110 Roundtable Dr., Tomball, TX 77375, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(12), 2484; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11122484
Received: 6 November 2019 / Accepted: 8 November 2019 / Published: 25 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Water Quality and Ecosystems)
The commenter’s key argument is that Diamond Lake’s problem is strictly one of biomass, i.e., introduction of the invasive Tui Chub fish. There are a few things to note in that respect. The Tui Chub is a bait fish. It is a lower-order prey fish for higher-order trout/salmonid species. Tui Chub is zooplanktivorous. Since the Tui Chub feed on zooplankton, if they themselves are prey for other species (or are being “culled” by artificial means), and there is no other entity to feed on the plankton and algae, the result would be a mass of plankton/algae bloom (i.e., harmful algal blooms (HABs)). This would lead to anoxic conditions in the euphotic zone, which puts even more stress on the higher-order trout/salmonid species. Our work found that the biological community (i.e., invertebrates and fish) are lagging indicators (i.e., response indicators). View Full-Text
Keywords: Cyanobacteria; ecological function; ecosystems; Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB); harmful cyanobacterial bloom (CyanoHAB); Proper Functioning Condition (PFC); Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL); Non-Point Source (NPS); Point Source (PS); Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ); Best Management Practice (BMP) Cyanobacteria; ecological function; ecosystems; Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB); harmful cyanobacterial bloom (CyanoHAB); Proper Functioning Condition (PFC); Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL); Non-Point Source (NPS); Point Source (PS); Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ); Best Management Practice (BMP)
MDPI and ACS Style

Hall, E.S.; Hall, R.K.; Aron, J.L.; Swanson, S.; Philbin, M.J.; Schafer, R.J.; Jones-Lepp, T.; Heggem, D.T.; Lin, J.; Wilson, E.; Kahan, H. Response to Comments for “An Ecological Function Approach to Managing Harmful Cyanobacteria in Three Oregon Lakes: Beyond Water Quality Advisories and Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs)”, Water 2019, 11, 1125. Water 2019, 11, 2484.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop