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Open AccessArticle

Interdisciplinary Critical Geographies of Water: Capturing the Mutual Shaping of Society and Hydrological Flows

1
Department of Earth Sciences, Air, Water and Landscape Science, Uppsala University, 75236 Uppsala, Sweden
2
Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science, CNDS, 75236 Uppsala, Sweden
3
Department of Integrated Water Systems and Governance, IHE Delft, 2611 AX Delft, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(10), 1973; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11101973
Received: 30 June 2019 / Revised: 5 September 2019 / Accepted: 18 September 2019 / Published: 22 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Water Resource Geography)
In light of recent calls for an increased commitment to interdisciplinary endeavors, this paper reflects on the implications of a critical geography of water that crosses social and natural sciences. Questions on how to best research the relationship between water and society have been raised both in the field of critical geographies of water and sociohydrology. Yet, there has been little crossover between these disciplinary perspectives. This, we argue, may be partly explained by the fact that interdisciplinary research is both advocated and antagonized. On the one hand, interdisciplinarity is argued to deliver more in terms of effectively informing policy processes and developing theoretical perspectives that can reform and regenerate knowledge. On the other hand, natural and social sciences are often presented as ontologically, epistemologically, and methodologically incompatible. Drawing on our own research experience and expertise, this paper focuses on the multiple ways in which critical geographies of water and sociohydrology are convergent, compatible, and complementary. We reflect on the existing theoretical instruments to engage in interdisciplinary research and question some of the assumptions on the methodological and epistemological incompatibility between natural and social sciences. We then propose that an interdisciplinary resource geography can further understandings of how power and the non-human co-constitute the social world and hydrological flows and advance conceptualizations of water as socionatures. View Full-Text
Keywords: critical geography; interdisciplinary studies; socionatures; hydrosocial cycle; sociohydrology critical geography; interdisciplinary studies; socionatures; hydrosocial cycle; sociohydrology
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Rusca, M.; Di Baldassarre, G. Interdisciplinary Critical Geographies of Water: Capturing the Mutual Shaping of Society and Hydrological Flows. Water 2019, 11, 1973.

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