Next Article in Journal
Applying a New Force–Velocity Synchronizing Algorithm to Derive Drag Coefficients of Rigid Vegetation in Oscillatory Flows
Next Article in Special Issue
The Stability of Tailings Dams under Dry-Wet Cycles: A Case Study in Luonan, China
Previous Article in Journal
Flow Partitioning Modelling Using High-Resolution Isotopic and Electrical Conductivity Data
Previous Article in Special Issue
WCSPH with Limiting Viscosity for Modeling Landslide Hazard at the Slopes of Artificial Reservoir
Article Menu
Issue 7 (July) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2018, 10(7), 905; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10070905

Analyzing the Effect of Soil Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy on Slope Stability Using a Coupled Hydromechanical Framework

Department of Resources of Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 6 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water-Induced Landslides: Prediction and Control)
Full-Text   |   PDF [4080 KB, uploaded 9 July 2018]   |  

Abstract

In studies on the effect of rainfall on slope stability, soil hydraulic conductivity is usually assumed to be isotropic to simplify the analysis. In the present study, a coupled hydromechanical framework based on transient seepage analysis and slope stability analysis is used to investigate the effects of hydraulic conductivity anisotropy on rainfall infiltration and slope safety at various slope locations (the top of the slope, the slope itself and the toe of the slope). The results show that when the vertical hydraulic conductivity (Ky) is constant, the horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kx) increases (i.e., anisotropy increases). This occurs because rainfall tends to infiltrate into the interior of the slope, resulting in the soil on top of the slope and on the slope itself being easily influenced by rainfall, leading to soil instability. The change of rainfall infiltration at the slope itself is the most significant. When the anisotropic ratio Kr (=Kx/Ky) increased from 1 to 100, the depth of the wetting zones for loam, silt and clay slopes increased by 23.3%, 33.3% and 50%, respectively. However, increased Kr led to a slower infiltration rate in the vertical direction at the toe of the slope. Compared to the results for Kr = 1 and for Kr = 100, the thickness of the wetting zones at the toe of loam and silt slopes decreased by 23.3% and 30.0%, respectively. For the clay slope, Kr changes did not significantly affect the wetting zones because of poor permeability. The results of this study suggest that the effect of soil hydraulic conductivity anisotropy should be considered when estimating slope stability to better understand the effect of rainfall on slopes. View Full-Text
Keywords: hydraulic conductivity anisotropy; infiltration; slope stability; coupled hydromechanical framework hydraulic conductivity anisotropy; infiltration; slope stability; coupled hydromechanical framework
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Yeh, H.-F.; Tsai, Y.-J. Analyzing the Effect of Soil Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy on Slope Stability Using a Coupled Hydromechanical Framework. Water 2018, 10, 905.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top