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Atmosphere 2018, 9(9), 356; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9090356

Comparison of Closed Chamber and Eddy Covariance Methods to Improve the Understanding of Methane Fluxes from Rice Paddy Fields in Japan

1
United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan
2
Leibniz Center of Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), 15374 Müncheberg, Germany
3
Institute of Agriculture and Horticulture, Faculty of Life Science, Humboldt University of Berlin, 14195 Berlin, Germany
4
Graduate School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kanagawa 214-8571, Japan
5
School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kanagawa 214-8571, Japan
6
Faculty of Agriculture at Kamphaeng Saen, Kasetsart University, Nakhon Pathom 73140, Thailand
Current address: Department of Biogeochemical System, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, Germany.
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 June 2018 / Revised: 5 September 2018 / Accepted: 13 September 2018 / Published: 15 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue C and N Cycling and Greenhouse Gases Emission in Agroecosystem)
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Abstract

Greenhouse gas flux monitoring in ecosystems is mostly conducted by closed chamber and eddy covariance techniques. To determine the relevance of the two methods in rice paddy fields at different growing stages, closed chamber (CC) and eddy covariance (EC) methods were used to measure the methane (CH4) fluxes in a flooded rice paddy field. Intensive monitoring using the CC method was conducted at 30, 60 and 90 days after transplanting (DAT) and after harvest (AHV). An EC tower was installed at the centre of the experimental site to provide continuous measurements during the rice cropping season. The CC method resulted in CH4 flux averages that were 58%, 81%, 94% and 57% higher than those measured by the EC method at 30, 60 and 90 DAT and after harvest (AHV), respectively. A footprint analysis showed that the area covered by the EC method in this study included non-homogeneous land use types. The different strengths and weaknesses of the CC and EC methods can complement each other, and the use of both methods together leads to a better understanding of CH4 emissions from paddy fields. View Full-Text
Keywords: methane flux; rice paddy field; eddy covariance technique; footprint analysis methane flux; rice paddy field; eddy covariance technique; footprint analysis
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Chaichana, N.; Bellingrath-Kimura, S.D.; Komiya, S.; Fujii, Y.; Noborio, K.; Dietrich, O.; Pakoktom, T. Comparison of Closed Chamber and Eddy Covariance Methods to Improve the Understanding of Methane Fluxes from Rice Paddy Fields in Japan. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 356.

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