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Article

Particle Size Analysis of African Dust Haze over the Last 20 Years: A Focus on the Extreme Event of June 2020

1
Department of Research in Geoscience, KaruSphère SASU, 97139 Abymes, Guadeloupe (F.W.I.), France
2
LaRGE Laboratoire de Recherche en Géosciences et Energies (EA 4539), Univ Antilles, 97100 Pointe-à-Pitre, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Liudmila Golobokova
Atmosphere 2021, 12(4), 502; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12040502
Received: 5 March 2021 / Revised: 2 April 2021 / Accepted: 9 April 2021 / Published: 15 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution Estimation)
Over the last decades, the impact of mineral dust from African deserts on human health and climate has been of great interest to the scientific community. In this paper, the climatological analysis of dusty events of the past 20 years in the Caribbean area has been performed using a particulate approach. The focus is made on June 2020 extreme event dubbed “Godzilla”. To carry out this study, different types of data were used (ground-based, satellites, model, and soundings) on several sites in the Caribbean islands. First, the magnitude of June 2020 event was clearly highlighted using satellite imagery. During the peak of this event, the value of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 μμm (PM10) reached a value 9 times greater than the threshold recommended by the World Health Organization in one day. Thereafter, the PM10, the aerosol optical depth, and the volume particle size distribution analyses exhibited their maximum values for June 2020. We also highlighted the exceptional characteristics of the Saharan air layer in terms of thickness and wind speed for this period. Finally, our results showed that the more the proportion of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 μμm (PM2.5) in PM10 increases, the more the influence of sea salt aerosols is significant. View Full-Text
Keywords: mineral dust; particle size; extreme event; Caribbean area mineral dust; particle size; extreme event; Caribbean area
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MDPI and ACS Style

Euphrasie-Clotilde, L.; Plocoste, T.; Brute, F.-N. Particle Size Analysis of African Dust Haze over the Last 20 Years: A Focus on the Extreme Event of June 2020. Atmosphere 2021, 12, 502. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12040502

AMA Style

Euphrasie-Clotilde L, Plocoste T, Brute F-N. Particle Size Analysis of African Dust Haze over the Last 20 Years: A Focus on the Extreme Event of June 2020. Atmosphere. 2021; 12(4):502. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12040502

Chicago/Turabian Style

Euphrasie-Clotilde, Lovely, Thomas Plocoste, and France-Nor Brute. 2021. "Particle Size Analysis of African Dust Haze over the Last 20 Years: A Focus on the Extreme Event of June 2020" Atmosphere 12, no. 4: 502. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12040502

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