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Article

Heatwaves in Kenya 1987–2016: Facts from CHIRTS High Resolution Satellite Remotely Sensed and Station Blended Temperature Dataset

Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development in Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
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Atmosphere 2021, 12(1), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12010037
Received: 10 November 2020 / Revised: 19 December 2020 / Accepted: 21 December 2020 / Published: 30 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Biometeorology)
As global temperatures continue to rise unabated, episodes of heat-related catastrophes across the world have intensified. In Kenya, heatwave phenomena and their associated impacts are ignored and neglected due to several reasons, including unreliable and inconsistent weather datasets and heatwave detection metrics. Based on CHIRTS satellite infrared estimates and station blended temperature, this study investigated the spatiotemporal distribution of the heatwave events over Kenya during 1987–2016 using the Heatwave Magnitude Index daily (HWMId). The results showed that contrary to the absence of heatwave records in official national and international disaster database about Kenya, the country experienced heatwaves ranging from less severe (normal) to deadly (super-extreme) between 1987 and 2016. The most affected areas were located in the eastern parts of the country, especially in Garissa and Tana River, and in the west-northern side around the upper side of Turkana county. It was also found that the recent years’ heatwaves were more severe in magnitude, duration, and spatial extent. The highest magnitude of the heatwaves was recorded in 2015 (HWMId = 22.64) while the average over the reference period is around 6. CHIRTS and HWMId were able to reveal and capture most critical heatwave events over the study period. Therefore, they could be used respectively as data source and detection metrics, for heatwaves disaster emergency warning over short period as well as for long-term projection to provide insight for adaptation strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: heatwaves; CHIRTS; HWMId; climate change; Kenya heatwaves; CHIRTS; HWMId; climate change; Kenya
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MDPI and ACS Style

Amou, M.; Gyilbag, A.; Demelash, T.; Xu, Y. Heatwaves in Kenya 1987–2016: Facts from CHIRTS High Resolution Satellite Remotely Sensed and Station Blended Temperature Dataset. Atmosphere 2021, 12, 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12010037

AMA Style

Amou M, Gyilbag A, Demelash T, Xu Y. Heatwaves in Kenya 1987–2016: Facts from CHIRTS High Resolution Satellite Remotely Sensed and Station Blended Temperature Dataset. Atmosphere. 2021; 12(1):37. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12010037

Chicago/Turabian Style

Amou, Martial, Amatus Gyilbag, Tsedale Demelash, and Yinlong Xu. 2021. "Heatwaves in Kenya 1987–2016: Facts from CHIRTS High Resolution Satellite Remotely Sensed and Station Blended Temperature Dataset" Atmosphere 12, no. 1: 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12010037

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