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Open AccessArticle

Analysis of Air Pollution in Urban Areas with Airviro Dispersion Model—A Case Study in the City of Sheffield, United Kingdom

1
Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, the University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK
2
Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, the University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK
3
Air Quality Monitoring & Modelling, Sheffield City Council, Howden House, 1 Union Street, Sheffield S1 2SH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2020, 11(3), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11030285
Received: 25 February 2020 / Revised: 12 March 2020 / Accepted: 13 March 2020 / Published: 15 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Dispersion of Pollutants in Urban Environments)
Two air pollutants, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM10), are monitored and modelled employing Airviro air quality dispersion modelling system in Sheffield, United Kingdom. The aim is to determine the most significant emission sources and their spatial variability. NOx emissions (ton/year) from road traffic, point and area sources for the year 2017 were 5370, 6774, and 2425, whereas those of PM10 (ton/year) were 345, 1449, and 281, respectively, which are part of the emission database. The results showed three hotspots of NOx, namely the Sheffield City Centre, Darnall and Tinsley Roundabout (M1 J34S). High PM10 concentrations were shown mainly between Sheffield Forgemasters International (a heavy engineering steel company) and Meadowhall Shopping Centre. Several emission scenarios were tested, which showed that NOx concentrations were mainly controlled by road traffic, whereas PM10 concentrations were controlled by point sources. Spatiotemporal variability and public exposure to air pollution were analysed. NOx concentration was greater than 52 µg/m3 in about 8 km2 area, where more than 66 thousand people lived. Models validated by observations can be used to fill in spatiotemporal gaps in measured data. The approach used presents spatiotemporal situation awareness maps that could be used for decision making and improving the urban infrastructure. View Full-Text
Keywords: air quality modelling; urban air quality; Airviro; dispersion modelling; Sheffield; emissions air quality modelling; urban air quality; Airviro; dispersion modelling; Sheffield; emissions
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MDPI and ACS Style

Munir, S.; Mayfield, M.; Coca, D.; Mihaylova, L.S.; Osammor, O. Analysis of Air Pollution in Urban Areas with Airviro Dispersion Model—A Case Study in the City of Sheffield, United Kingdom. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 285.

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