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Atmosphere 2019, 10(2), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10020072

Response of Soil N2O Emissions to Soil Microbe and Enzyme Activities with Aeration at Two Irrigation Levels in Greenhouse Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Fields

1,2
,
1
,
1,2,* and 1
1
Key Laboratory of Agricultural Soil and Water Engineering in Arid and Semiarid Areas of Ministry of Education, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
2
College of Water Resources and Architectural Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 January 2019 / Revised: 31 January 2019 / Accepted: 6 February 2019 / Published: 11 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nitrous Oxide Emission in the Atmosphere)
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Abstract

Aerated irrigation is proven to increase soil N2O emissions; however, the mechanisms of N2O release are still unknown. A field experiment for two consecutive greenhouse tomato-growing seasons, from August 2016 to July 2017, was carried out to examine (1) the differences of aeration and irrigation on soil N2O emissions with a static chamber GC technique, and on soil physical and biotic parameters, and (2) the response of soil N2O emissions to soil physical and biotic parameters. Two irrigation levels were included: 60% (low irrigation) and 100% (high irrigation) of the full irrigation amount. Each irrigation level contained aeration and control, totaling four treatments. During the two growing seasons, soil N2O emissions with aeration were 4.5% higher than the control (p > 0.05). Soil N2O emissions under the high irrigation were 13.8% greater than under the low irrigation, and the difference was significant in 2017 (p < 0.05). Aeration and irrigation had positive effects on the mean soil nitrifier abundance and mean soil urease activity, and the impact of irrigation on urease was significant in 2016 (p = 0.001). In addition, aeration negatively influenced the mean soil denitrifier abundance, while irrigation positively influenced the mean soil denitrifier abundance. Regression analysis showed that the soil water-filled pore space, temperature, and denitrifier abundance were primary factors influencing soil N2O fluxes. This study provides a further understanding of the processes affecting soil N2O emissions and N dynamics, which may assist in developing mitigation strategies to reduce N2O emissions. View Full-Text
Keywords: aerated irrigation; soil N2O emissions; nitrifier; denitrifier; soil urease activity aerated irrigation; soil N2O emissions; nitrifier; denitrifier; soil urease activity
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Chen, H.; Shang, Z.; Cai, H.; Zhu, Y. Response of Soil N2O Emissions to Soil Microbe and Enzyme Activities with Aeration at Two Irrigation Levels in Greenhouse Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Fields. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 72.

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