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The Role of MicroRNAs in Diabetic Complications—Special Emphasis on Wound Healing

1
Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra 3004-517, Portugal
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Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center, Little Rock, Arkansas, AR 72202, USA
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Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR 72202, USA
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Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72202, USA
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Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72202, USA
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The Portuguese Diabetes Association (APDP), Lisbon 1250 203, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genes 2014, 5(4), 926-956; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes5040926
Received: 5 June 2014 / Revised: 5 September 2014 / Accepted: 10 September 2014 / Published: 29 September 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue miRNA Regulation)
Overweight and obesity are major problems in today’s society, driving the prevalence of diabetes and its related complications. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the chronic complications in diabetes in order to develop better therapeutic approaches for these conditions. Some of the most important complications include macrovascular abnormalities, e.g., heart disease and atherosclerosis, and microvascular abnormalities, e.g., retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, in particular diabetic foot ulceration. The highly conserved endogenous small non-coding RNA molecules, the micro RNAs (miRNAs) have in recent years been found to be involved in a number of biological processes, including the pathogenesis of disease. Their main function is to regulate post-transcriptional gene expression by binding to their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs), leading to mRNA degradation, suppression of translation or even gene activation. These molecules are promising therapeutic targets and demonstrate great potential as diagnostic biomarkers for disease. This review aims to describe the most recent findings regarding the important roles of miRNAs in diabetes and its complications, with special attention given to the different phases of diabetic wound healing. View Full-Text
Keywords: microRNA; diabetes; macrovascular and microvascular complications; skin; wound healing; inflammation; vascular disease; diagnostic biomarkers; therapeutic targets microRNA; diabetes; macrovascular and microvascular complications; skin; wound healing; inflammation; vascular disease; diagnostic biomarkers; therapeutic targets
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MDPI and ACS Style

Moura, J.; Børsheim, E.; Carvalho, E. The Role of MicroRNAs in Diabetic Complications—Special Emphasis on Wound Healing. Genes 2014, 5, 926-956.

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