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Open AccessReview

Challenges in Human Skin Microbial Profiling for Forensic Science: A Review

1
School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
2
Office of the Chief Forensic Scientist, Victoria Police Forensic Services Centre, Macleod 3085, Australia
3
School of Molecular Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genes 2020, 11(9), 1015; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11091015
Received: 30 July 2020 / Revised: 20 August 2020 / Accepted: 26 August 2020 / Published: 28 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forensic Genetics and Genomics)
The human microbiome is comprised of the microbes that live on and within an individual, as well as immediately surrounding them. Microbial profiling may have forensic utility in the identification or association of individuals with criminal activities, using microbial signatures derived from a personal microbiome. This review highlights some important aspects of recent studies, many of which have revealed issues involving the effect of contamination of microbial samples from both technical and environmental sources and their impacts on microbiome research and the potential forensic applications of microbial profiling. It is imperative that these challenges be discussed and evaluated within a forensic context to better understand the future directions and potential applications of microbial profiling for human identification. It is necessary that the limitations identified be resolved prior to the adoption of microbial profiling, or, at a minimum, acknowledged by those applying this new approach. View Full-Text
Keywords: human microbiome; microbial profiling; forensic science; microbial transfer; forensic limitations human microbiome; microbial profiling; forensic science; microbial transfer; forensic limitations
MDPI and ACS Style

Neckovic, A.; A. H. van Oorschot, R.; Szkuta, B.; Durdle, A. Challenges in Human Skin Microbial Profiling for Forensic Science: A Review. Genes 2020, 11, 1015.

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